Florida International University

Miami Herald

TALLAHASSEE --- Alleging “inferior” online classes after campuses closed this spring because of the coronavirus, a Florida International University student has filed what is at least the third potential class-action lawsuit seeking refunds for students in the state university system.

Attorneys for Sarah Fagundez, an FIU graduate student from Miami, filed the lawsuit late Tuesday in Leon County circuit court against the university system’s Board of Governors. It came a day after a similar lawsuit was filed in federal court against the University of Florida Board of Trustees and a little more than a week after another case was filed against the Board of Governors in circuit court.

Courtesy of Annika Aldana

Students hoping to attend South Florida universities are earning scholarship money by volunteering in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic — even while staying at home to stop the spread of the disease.

Screenshot from Zoom

Your scene partner is delivering a line when his face freezes on the computer screen. Your little brother won’t stay quiet long enough for you to videotape a rehearsal in your childhood bedroom. Your senior production: Canceled.

Ministerio de Salud de Costa Rica

Like so many doctors around the world, pediatric surgeon Roberto Herrera was exposed to the new coronavirus back in early March.

“Of course I was scared at first,” says Herrera. That's in no small part because he was also at-risk: he’s 61 and asthmatic. But Herrera insists he was never panicked. After all, he says, he lives in Costa Rica – which has reported only seven COVID-19 deaths and fewer than 800 cases.

Ramon Espinosa / AP

Cuba has officially registered fewer than 1700 COVID-19 cases. But new data released by one of the island’s most respected institutes suggests the number may be much higher.

Ministerio de Salud de Ecuador

Ecuador's new health minister, Dr. Juan Carlos Zevallos, talks with WLRN's Latin America Report about the "horrifying" experience of trying to get his country's COVID-19 pandemic crisis under control. Calling Ecuador unprepared, he says, is "absolutely unfair."

Michelle Marchante / Miami Herald

The COVID-19 pandemic forced Florida International University’s classes online and its students off campus for the spring semester. Summer courses will be remote, too. Administrators have not yet announced plans for the fall.

AP

COMMENTARY

COVID-19 is producing a feel-good story across Latin America.

According to this silver linings playbook, the pandemic is neutralizing the powerful street gangs that have made the region the world’s most criminally violent. It’s lowering murder rates and raising gangbangers’ civic consciousness. Post-coronavirus Latin America will be a continent of lions lying with lambs – and no longer such a rampant source of illegal immigration to the U.S.

El Nuevo Herald file

UPDATED: This story was updated with new information at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, March 12.

Three major South Florida universities are moving classes online temporarily in an attempt to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The decisions will affect tens of thousands of students and represent one of the most significant disruptions to daily life in South Florida since the global pandemic began.

Courtesy of Florida International University's Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management

On this Thursday, Feb. 20, episode of Sundial:

Environmental reporter moderates presidential debate

The Democratic presidential debate in Nevada was moderated by its first climate journalist, Vanessa Hauc. 

"The Democratic field takes [climate change] very seriously," Hauc says. "Right now, we have a clear understanding of what is happening to our planet."

Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

Sleep-deprived adolescents are more likely to carry handguns, even to school, according to new research from Florida International University.

Courtesy of Florida International University

Students and faculty stood up and clapped as keynote speaker Yusef Salaam, one of the members of the exonerated “Central Park Five,” walked on stage at the Graham Center Ballrooms at Florida International University. 

“Right now we are on the cusp of everything that Dr. King talked about in the ‘I Have A Dream’ speech,” said Salaam, the keynote speaker at the 29th annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Commemorative Breakfast.

YouTube

In 2012, the Presidents of Venezuela and Iran met at the Miraflores Palace in Caracas. The bromance between Hugo Chávez and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad alarmed Washington, since Venezuela and Iran were (and still are) sworn enemies of the U.S. So Chávez had fun joking that Ahmadinejad had come to help him “fire large missiles” at America.

That remark may have sounded merely mischievous back then. But not today. Not with the U.S. and Iran actually trading missile fire this month and raising fears of a larger military conflict.

PEDRO PORTAL / Miami Herald

Failures in design, lack of adequate oversight and systematic negligence led to the fatal collapse of the Florida International University pedestrian bridge, federal investigators concluded nearly two years after the deadly incident.

Brent Stirton / National Geographic

National Geographic Cuban-American explorer Mireya Mayor has returned to her hometown of Miami. The former Miami Dolphins cheerleader has traveled to the most remote places of the world like Madagascar and the Congo. Mayor has swum with sharks, been chased by elephants, bitten by poisonous bugs and charged by gorillas. Her adventures have landed her the nickname in the national media the female Indiana Jones. 

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