Florida jobs

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

Shipmonk was used to hiring people fast to fill jobs in its expanding Fort Lauderdale wareshouse. Since COVID-19 hit, the company has been telling some job applicants to show up for their first day of work without even an interview.

Bob Krist / Florida Keys New Bureau

When Marlins Park opened in 2012, a neomodern shrine to baseball rising in Miami’s Little Havana, Duane Thwaites figured he’d found his dream job.

The Brooklyn native moved to Miami nearly 30 years ago, raised his four kids, got hired for opening day and returned every season, climbing the ladder to supervise a concession.

“It's just hard to explain why I like the job and I stick with it, but it's, you know, I feel it's like my passion,” said Thwaites, 51.

‘Have Faith In This President,’ Says Pence To Latinos In Florida

Jan 17, 2020
MATIAS J. OCNER / MIAMI HERALD

When it comes to courting Hispanic voters, Vice President Mike Pence might seem an unlikely candidate to serve as President Donald Trump’s top liaison. But while he isn’t bilingual, the deeply religious, born-again Pence speaks a language that matters: religion.

And so, wearing his faith on his tailored sleeve, Pence stood inside a Spanish-language church outside of Orlando on Thursday and gave a speech that book-ended talk of jobs, immigration, and military might with calls for those “who bow the head and bend the knee” to deliver another four years in office to Trump.

Several southern states including Georgia and Mississippi have enacted similar laws requiring employers to check the immigration status of new hires. The state laws have become part of the national debate over immigration.

Previous efforts to get an E-Verify bill through the Florida Legislature failed, and leading Republican lawmakers were not fully behind the governor's position as the 2020 session began earlier this week.

Days before the beginning of the legislative session, Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nuñez said DeSantis is "trying to fulfill one of his campaign promises."

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

South Florida’s real estate industry earnings for those selling and leasing commercial and residential spaces shrank in recent years, according to a study by LeadMD.

But some local real estate pioneers say their experiences tell a different story.

Cholakov-Gongalov Architects / Creative Commons

Would you leave your job because of a challenging supervisor?

A new survey by international staffing firm Robert Half International says 58 percent of workers in South Florida already have. That’s nine percentage points more than the rest of the nation.

The percentage of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods in Florida has decreased 8 percent since the Great Recession, according to a new study from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Kaylee Rodriguez / WLRN

College graduation is here. And you've probably been seeing a lot of photos of recent graduates from the class of 2019 with their caps, gowns and smiles. But what happens to South Florida graduates after they receive their diploma?

Some will continue their education into graduate school. Others are heading into the job market. Some will be staying in South Florida to build their lives and careers. And others will leave to try and find their dreams in another place. And many will be leaving with student loan debt.

A new report shows that people who work outdoors in all 67 Florida counties frequently work in dangerously hot conditions as climate change leads to hotter days and more of them.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A smart new building in Palm Beach Gardens is drawing visitors and jobs.

United Technologies Corp. cut the ribbon on its Center for Intelligent Buildings in a ceremony Tuesday.

The building is part headquarters, part product showcase, according to UTC Climate, Controls & Security President Bob McDonough.

“We’re a company that does many different things. HVAC, elevators, escalators, fire and security, building automation,” said McDonough. “This is the first place where I can bring people to show them all of that technology under one roof.”

courtsey of Amazon

Bob Swindell learned that South Florida made Amazon's shortlist for its second corporate headquarters like a lot of people -- from a news alert on his phone.

Swindell did not get a heads up that an announcement was coming or that the bid he worked on would be included. He is the president and CEO of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance, one of three county economic development agencies in South Florida that collaborated on the effort to lure one of the world's largest companies to make a second home here.

ribbon-cutting
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

A pair of very large scissors and an orange carpet were rolled out in the Fort Lauderdale sun Friday afternoon.

The orange-themed German rental car company, Sixt-Rent-A-Car, opened its North American headquarters in the city. 

Sixt, which is known for renting luxury vehicles at “an economy cost,” will add 300 new jobs to the area over the next five years.  Florida’s recently released October jobs report showed unemployment across the state is down to a decade-low  3.6 percent. In Broward County, that number is even lower, at 3.3 percent. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Florida Gov. Rick Scott dropped by a Boca Raton company Thursday to highlight a major job announcement.

Modernizing Medicine, a health information technology firm, said it will create more than 800 new jobs in Palm Beach County by 2022.

The company makes tablet computer software that helps doctors work more efficiently. It started in a Boynton Beach office with two employees in 2010 — the same year Scott was elected to the first of his two four-year terms.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Over the past year, Florida has been second only to California in the number of new jobs created with just over a quarter of a million new jobs. But California’s labor market is twice the size of Florida’s. The rate of growth of Florida's job market also ranked second in the nation at 3.1 percent. (Oregon was No. 1.)

 

Tom Hudson

Through all the tawdry talk, accusations and innuendo during this election American voters have been consistent in saying the economy is their big issue.

 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, which includes South Florida in its territory, quizzed 200 companies throughout the region. One out of three of them said the election was having an effect on their business decisions such as investing in their companies or hiring new workers.

 

Pages