Florida Power & Light

Steve Newborn / WUSF

The two biggest utilities in Florida - Duke Energy and the parent company of Florida Power and Light - have just announced they plan to cut their emissions by more than half by 2030. And North Carolina-based Duke wants to eliminate their carbon output by mid-century.

A proposed change to the state Constitution that would alter the way Floridians get their electricity came before the state Supreme Court Wednesday. The amendment needs the justices' blessings before it can get on next year's ballot.

South Florida Sun Sentinel

Boil-water notice issued for Lauderhill areas.

A boil-water notice was issued Sunday evening for parts of Lauderhill after Florida Power & Light Co. broke a water main.

Covered by the notice are the following areas: 2351-2551 NW 41st Avenue, 26th Street from State Road 7 to Northwest 42nd Avenue, and 2439-2701 State Road 7.

Read more at the Sun Sentinel.

FPL And AT&T Fight Over Utility Poles

Aug 1, 2019
MIAMI HERALD file

In a clash of two of the state’s most-prominent companies, Florida Power & Light and AT&T Florida are battling in court and at the Federal Communications Commission about payments for the use of utility poles.

City of Fort Lauderdale / Courtesy

It has been four days since residents in the Las Olas Isles area of Fort Lauderdale have been able to drink water from their taps without boiling it first — and it’ll be at least two days more before that changes.

The city extended the boil-water order until at least late Wednesday after the system failed to pass bacteriological tests. Tests must come back clean two consecutive days before the order can be lifted.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

For residents of one West Palm Beach neighborhood, some ground-shuddering repetitive banging is a small price to pay for power that stays on even during high winds.

The residents of Bradley Court are in the midst of a Florida Power and Light project to bring their power lines underground, where tree-toppling gusts have a slimmer chance of shutting off the lights.

power lines FPL
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

FPL
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Just as the company says it’s hardening the power grid against future hurricanes, Florida Power & Light is also making some of its service centers more resilient against storm damages. 

FPL
Florida Power & Light Company / WLRN

Hurricane season is fast approaching, which means summer is nearly here, as well. For South Florida, this signals increased attention on storm forecasts and applying lessons learned when it comes to evacuation and emergency plans, storm shutters and the possibility of losing power during the most sweltering time of the year.

Last year, more than 700,000 homes had their power knocked out as Hurricane Irma arrived in South Florida. It hit the lower Keys as a Category 4 storm but slowed down to a Cat. 1 as it made its way up the Florida peninsula. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

With hurricane season fast approaching, Florida Power and Light is testing its systems — and more than 3,000 employees — to make sure they can get the lights back on quickly after a storm.

All this week at the Riviera Beach command center, the company is drilling for a hypothetical storm with characteristics similar to Hurricane Wilma, which struck Florida in 2005.

The company said it’s applying lessons learned from Hurricane Irma.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

A plan to use treated wastewater to freshen Florida Power & Light’s troubled nuclear cooling canals will move forward, for now, without meeting strict water standards set for nearby Biscayne Bay.

On Tuesday, Miami-Dade commissioners authorized the county staff to negotiate the deal, but put off setting the standards.

Instead, terms of the costly treatment will be ironed out as the utility and the county staff work out details. Any project will ultimately come back to commissioners for final approval. But by then, critics worry it may be too late.

Florida Power and Light commissioned the Wildflower Solar Energy Center in Desoto County late last week. It’s one of four new solar power plants that FPL opened on Jan. 1 of this year.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

TALLAHASSEE -- In a rare rebuke to Florida Power & Light, state utility regulators Tuesday rejected the company’s request to charge $49 million more for the planning of a nuclear reactor that the company cannot say will ever be built.

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