florida weather

The first named storm of the season, Subtropical Storm Alberto, came ashore Monday along the Florida Panhandle, bringing heavy rain to a wide swath of the Southeast and claiming the lives of two journalists on duty in North Carolina.

Anchor Mike McCormick and photojournalist Aaron Smeltzer of WYFF News 4 were killed when a tree fell on their SUV, officials and WYFF said.

Subtropical Storm Alberto has made a turn to the north and will likely make landfall Monday evening near Destin, Florida. Conditions were already deteriorating quickly near Panama City and Apalachicola Monday morning, with wind gusts between 40 and 50 mph being noted just offshore.

Subtropical Storm Alberto may be pulling away from South Florida, but the heavy rain and potential flood risk isn't going anywhere.  In fact, conditions could get worse before the get better.

A Flood Watch continues for all of South Florida through 8 pm Sunday evening, and the National Weather Service could extend it into Monday.

Subtropical Storm Alberto is now forecast to strengthen and take a track a little closer to Florida's west coast. This has prompted the National Hurricane Center to issue a Tropical Storm Watch for much of the Greater Tampa Bay Area. A Storm Surge Watch has also been issued for sections of the Nature Coast north of Crystal River.

Updated at 7:01 p.m. ET

Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in all 67 counties on Saturday in preparation for Subtropical Storm Alberto.

10:45 am update from the National Hurricane Center: Subtropical Storm Alberto is now official. The National Hurricane Center reports the storm had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph and sustained winds of 39 mph.  It's moving north, northeast at six mph.

A tropical storm is likely to form in the Gulf of Mexico by Saturday, potentially strengthening and approaching the Florida Panhandle by Memorial Day.

Up to four major hurricanes could form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, according to the annual forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Overall, the season will likely be normal or somewhat more intense than normal, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, with a 25 percent chance that hurricane activity will be below normal.

The Rain Might Have a Name This Weekend

May 24, 2018

Heavy rain is coming to most of Florida this weekend. There's no doubt about it. Whether the multi-day deluge has a memorable name is the less important question.

Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday directed the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to put high-water vehicles in position to respond as the National Hurricane Season monitored a large area of showers that extended from the northwestern Caribbean across Cuba and into the Florida peninsula.

“Although the storm currently has a relatively low chance of development into a tropical system, we must take it seriously,” Scott said in a prepared statement.

OrangeSTEM

In South Florida, a regional weather forecast often just doesn't cut it.

Hurricane Center Watching Gulf this Week

May 22, 2018

Heavy rain, localized flooding, and unsettled seas are possible anywhere from coastal Louisiana to Florida over the Memorial Day weekend. A disturbance in the western Caribbean is forecast to move into the Gulf of Mexico later this week, where it could acquire tropical characteristics before drifting ashore.

In a statement Monday morning, the National Hurricane Center gave the potential system a low, or 20 percent, chance of developing into a tropical depression or storm over the next five days.

 

Flood Watch Extended For Broward As Rain Refuses To Let Up In South Florida

May 21, 2018
Joe Cavaretta / Sun-Sentinel

Unceasing rain on Sunday — especially in parts of Broward where more than a foot of rain fell — flooded roads, stalled cars and even cut off power across South Florida.

And it's not over yet.

"I know everyone is tired of dealing with the rain, but its going to stick around a little longer," said Barry Baxter, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

The Florida Bar is trying to get the word out about a free, online legal service for low-income Floridians before hurricane season starts and storm damage becomes an issue.

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