florida weather

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

While many people in shelters across South Florida are glued to televisions, anxiously waiting for Hurricane Irma to pass, there have been some happy moments as these shelters turn into mini communities.

Among stacks of blankets and air mattresses in the cafeteria at the Falcon Cove Middle School shelter in Weston, Hunter Fugh squirts icing from a tube onto a cake.

"It's chocolate flavored and it has chocolate frosting on the top. We’re eating cake because it’s my birthday," said now 6-year-old Hunter.

This post was updated on Sept. 10, 2017 at 10:46 a.m.  

As Hurricane Irma slams into the Florida Keys and brings hurricane-force winds and storm surges to South Florida, residents are hunkered down in emergency shelters. And while some shelters have closed their doors for the most dangerous storm conditions, you should still know what your evacuation zone is and where to go.

Are You In An Evacuation Zone? Here Is How To Know

Sep 8, 2017

As the possibilities of hurricane Irma hitting South Florida increase, authorities are encouraging residents to prepare for a possible landfall. Part of the preparations includes knowing if you live in an evacuation zone and making plans in case you are asked to leave your home. Here is how to know, for all four south Florida counties: Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe and Palm Beach.  

Get the latest information about Hurricane Irma at WLRN.org/weather

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

With the whole state on alert from Hurricane Irma, it is important to know common hurricane terminology. The most important, and yet confusing, of which is the difference between a hurricane watch and warning.

In the simplest terms, if you are living in a county under a hurricane warning, you can expect hurricane conditions to affect your area. Whereas, if your county is under a hurricane watch, hurricane conditions are possible.

Pilar Uribe / WLRN

See a spike in prices of essential items you will need to be prepared for an eventual landing of Hurricane Irma in Florida? State authorities want to hear about it.

After Gov. Rick Scott declared an official state of emergency in Florida's 67 counties on Monday, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi opened the hotline 1-866-9-NO-SCAM so consumers can report incidents of price gouging.

Hurricane Irma Strengthened To Category 5

Sep 5, 2017

Updated: 4:35 p.m. 

Hurricane Irma has become the most powerful hurricane on record in the Atlantic Ocean outside the Caribbean or the Gulf of Mexico. 

The storm is a strong Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, with sustained winds up to 185 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Floridians are old pros when it comes to hurricane preparation, but these last few years of near hurricane drought may have taken the edge off storm preparation.

But Harvey's Texas devastation is a stark reminder about the kind of damage a major hurricane can do.


Irma Now a Category 4 with an Eye on Florida

Sep 5, 2017

Irma strengthened Monday afternoon to a Category 4 storm, and the latest forecast data suggests the Major Hurricane will approach South Florida this weekend. It was too soon to make or deny that call in the past few days, but it’s now time for all Floridians in a hurricane prone area - no matter which coast you live along - to take Irma seriously.

Tropical Storm Irma intensified steadily overnight and is now expected to become a Major Hurricane this weekend over the central Atlantic.

Jeff Huffman, Meteorologist from the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, indicated that it's not clear yet if the storm will hit Florida. 

"I think it will be at least this weekend before we can get a good handle on Irma's path as it relates to the U.S.," said Huffman.  "The forecast is pretty clear cut over the next five to seven days, but the steering currents that would guide it beyond then are quite complex."

Twenty-five years ago, in those harrowing days and weeks after Hurricane Andrew, people were trying to figure out how to cope with the destruction and trauma that the storm left behind. One of the ways they did that was by recording songs and sending them to TV meteorologist Bryan Norcross.

A new tropical storm is likely to form in the western Atlantic later today, but Meteorologist Jeff Huffman is more concerned with what's behind it.

"Soon-to-be tropical Storm Harvey is forecast to become a hurricane, but track well to the south through the Caribbean. Behind it, the tropical wave referred to as Invest 92, is more likely to move in the general direction of Florida by early next week. Confidence at this time, however, is low on whether it will develop or how strong it might become", said Huffman.

Hurricane season doesn't officially start until June 1, but preparations are already underway. The National Weather Service outlined some new ways it's warning Floridians about possible danger at a briefing Tuesday in Tampa. 

National Weather Service

The state tourism industry calls it “Bragging Season”. To the weather community, the three-month period from December to February is referred to as meteorological winter. This year, however, many Floridians are asking themselves “what winter?”

 

Teresa Frontado / WLRN

Authorities are still assessing damage in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties after two tornadoes touched ground early Monday morning. 

Two crews from the National Weather Service in Miami inspected damage in South Florida -- one in Miami-Dade County in Hialeah and Miami Springs, the second in Palm Beach County near Palm Beach and Juno Springs. 

Watches and warnings were issued Sunday, but some civilians were caught by surprise as the storm crept up on them early Monday morning. 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Brackish water infused with leaves, garbage and fertilizers crept up the legs of people standing in suits and skirts in downtown Fort Lauderdale Monday morning.

Broward county officials - along with academics from Florida Atlantic University and private sector entrepreneurs - willingly gathered on the corner of Las Olas Boulevard and 25th Avenue.

U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch got a close up look at the flooding caused by king tides.

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