food stamps

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

For people who don't have consistent access to food, the effects of Hurricane Dorian could linger for weeks.

Floridians who were scheduled to receive federal SNAP benefits, or food stamps, between Sept. 1 and 14 were allowed to get that help early, on Aug. 31, so they could prepare for the storm. But advocates worry they could run out of food by mid-September.

The Trump administration's proposal to push millions of people out of the federal food stamp program would punish some of the country's neediest, including children, seniors and people with disabilities, according to mayors of 70 American cities who have sent a letter to an administrator for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

The Trump administration wants to change the way states determine who qualifies for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, benefits, also known as food stamps. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 3 million people would lose their food assistance as a result.

Walmart is expanding a program that allows for online orders of groceries to be picked up and paid for with food stamps at more than 2,500 locations.

It's the latest move by a major retailer to give low-income shoppers more options for using food stamps in the modern era of online shopping. Walmart, one of the world's largest retailers, began piloting the use of food stamps for online grocery pickup service in 2017 in a few locations.

Three-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect.

A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule.

If you peer into Americans' grocery carts, you're unlikely to see a mix of foods and beverages that make for an ideal diet. And this is true for many of the nearly 42 million people who receive food stamps, too.

Food Stamp Program Makes Fresh Produce More Affordable

Jan 16, 2018

Rebeca Gonzalez grew up eating artichokes from her grandmother's farm in the central Mexican state of Tlaxcala. But for years after emigrating to the U.S., she did not feed them to her own kids because the spiky, fibrous vegetables were too expensive on this side of the border.

When she prepared meals at her family's home in Garden Grove, Calif., Gonzalez would also omit avocados, a staple of Mexican cuisine that are often costly here.

The delivery of federal food benefits for millions of low-income people is likely to change after the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it'll allow states more flexibility in how they dole out the money.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

Senior citizens and people with disabilities who have pre-registered online will be able to conduct the qualifying interviews to receive Disaster Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (D-SNAP)   aid over the phone starting this weekend, according to an announcement of the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF), which administers the program in the state.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

There is still a chance for some people to sign up for D-SNAP disaster food assistance in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN News

Lines were moving much more quickly at Hard Rock Stadium at mid-day Thursday, the final day to register for disaster food assistance (D-SNAP) in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

After reaching capacity early Wednesday amid accounts of people passing out in the heat, the registration sites seemed to have finally gotten into the swing of things Thursday.

Sweaty and eager to be done waiting in line, most were just happy to get the assistance they walked away with, ranging between $192 and $1,153.

JOE CAVARETTA / Sun Sentinel

Thousands of people converged on two of South Florida’s sports sites for the final day of sign-ups for Hurricane Irma food stamps.

Sign-ups for the Food for Florida program run through 7 p.m. at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens and the BB&T Center in Sunrise.

More than 38,000 families have registered at Hard Rock Stadium for the disaster food program since sign-ups started Tuesday, according to DCF.

People waiting in line
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

On the first day of make-up registration for disaster food assistance, lines were long, while lawyers who were suing over how the program has been rolled out hashed things out in court.

Matias Ocner / Miami Herald

For those impacted by Hurricane Irma who missed out on getting emergency food stamps earlier this month from the Florida Department of Children and Families, there will be a second chance.

On Monday, DCF announced Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (DSNAP) benefits will be distributed during a three-day span at a Miami-Dade and Broward site.

WLRN

Today in Sundial: Tens of thousands of South Florida residents are still in need of food assistance more than a month after Hurricane Irma smashed through the region. Recently, people waited in lines for hours to qualify for D-Snap, a federal program being facilitated by the Florida Department of Children and Families.

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