gender

Christine Garcia, a 37-year-old stay-at-home mom, doesn't consider herself a particularly political person. But like a lot of women, she has strong opinions about President Trump.

"Maybe on the business side ... the money is better as far as I understand," Garcia said. "But a lot of the other things are very worrisome," she added with a laugh, as she pushed her daughter on a swing in a park in Birmingham, Mich., an affluent suburb of Detroit.

Garcia considers herself a fiscal conservative but a social liberal.

Gender gaps aren't just for the workplace, and the midterm elections are proving it. An NPR analysis of campaign finance records shows that Democratic women candidates face a fundraising gap, compared to Democratic men, in the party's toughest House races.

Editor's note: NPR is examining the role of women in the 2018 midterm elections all week. To follow upcoming coverage and look back at how the role of women in the 2014 midterms was covered, click here.

Women represent 20 percent of Congress members right now, and Republicans and Democrats differ sharply on why that's the case, not to mention how big of a problem that is.

That in and of itself is perhaps unsurprising, especially at a time when the parties are heavily divided on a wide variety of topics. But a new poll shows that men and women within each party — and especially among Republicans — differ heavily on several of these questions.

Sam Turken / WLRN

WLRN interns spent some time this summer looking at how the idea of gender is changing in South Florida. This story is part of their project.

Teenagers often spend their afternoons at the West Palm Beach Police Athletic League playing sports, watching movies and using computers.

But on one Monday afternoon in July, a group of middle and high school boys did something different. They participated in a discussion about rape and how not to objectify women.

Riane Roldan / WLRN

WLRN interns spent some time this summer looking at how the idea of gender is changing in South Florida. This story is part of their project.

At a journal-making workshop in early August, a group of 20 people gathered around tables at the Miami Workers Center in Liberty City. They talked loudly while folding paper, cutting fabric and gluing cardboard together to create a hardcover journal from scratch.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

WLRN interns spent some time this summer looking at how the idea of gender is changing in South Florida. This story is part of their project.

Comedian Jannelys Santos has been performing improv sketches with The Villain Theater since the collective started in 2015. She describes herself as feminine and aggressive, wanting to express her sexuality onstage.

For almost 40 years, Pilar Navarro thought her daughter was dead.

She gave birth at a private Catholic hospital in Madrid in 1973, anxious to start a family. But less than 24 hours after delivery, Navarro's nurse — who was a nun — told her and her husband that the baby had died from respiratory issues. The young couple could not see the body because the hospital had already baptized and buried the child, according to the nurse.

"We never thought a doctor or a nun would do something like that," says Navarro, who is now 68. "We couldn't understand it."

In October of 2013, the federal government shut down for 16 days — the third longest shutdown in history. A few women in particular came together to end the gridlock, including Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins and Minnesota Democrat Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Courtesy In Good Company Miami

A new meet-up series called “Locker Room Talk” gives men in Miami a space to gather and discuss different issues that affect them.

Akie Smythe, co-founder of In Good Company Miami, the group that hosts the talks, says he wanted to build a community for men to have honest conversations with each other and network. 

Past conversation topics have ranged from the meaning of consent to marriage and forgiveness. On Thursday (August 9), the meetup will tackle vulnerability.

Smythe says vulnerability is a strength, but it isn't always viewed that way for men. 

A deceptively simple hashtag has climbed to the top of Twitter's trending lists across Argentina: #EsHoy, or "It's Today." The phrase, imbued as it is with fervent expectation, may seem puzzling to outsiders — but inside the country, the meaning is crystal clear.

With Tuesday's primaries, women have hit another milestone in this record-breaking political year, setting a new record for the number of women who have secured a major party nomination for the U.S. House.

Democrats and Republicans have nominated 185 women to run for the House in November, as of Wednesday morning, according to the Center for Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

The figure breaks the prior record of 167 nominees set in 2016.

A group of Democratic senators have introduced a bill on Tuesday that would require the U.S. census and the country's largest survey to start directly asking about sexual orientation and gender identity.

If the Census Equality Act becomes law, sexual orientation and gender identity questions would have to be added to forms for the census by 2030 and for the American Community Survey — a survey that about 1 in 38 households are required by federal law to complete every year — by 2020.

Heading May Be Riskier For Female Soccer Players Than Males

Jul 31, 2018

The first rule of soccer is pretty obvious: don't use your hands. But soccer's signature move, heading the ball, can cause a detectable impact on players' brains. And according to a study published Tuesday in Radiology, female players are more sensitive to the impact than males.

Mexico's hard swing to the left in this month's national elections also swept in some other historic firsts. Women won key positions across the country, including, for the first time ever, the mayor of Mexico City.

Claudia Sheinbaum Pardo, 56, will assume arguably the second most important political post in Mexico, after capturing nearly 50 percent of the vote in the July 1 elections.

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