gun control

As high school students who survived the shooting in Parkland, Fla., travel to the state Capitol to demand action on guns, lawmakers offered a glimpse of the battle they face.

In Tuesday's session, which opened with prayer for the community of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and staff were killed last week, Florida House lawmakers declined to open debate on a bill that would ban assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Cheers and hugs welcomed a barefoot Jorge Sempere as he finished a 12-mile journey from West Boca Community High School and arrived at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Tuesday morning to protest gun violence in the wake of the school’s massacre.

He and other students from West Boca High walked out of their school campus to show solidarity with their neighboring peers, some of whom had just embarked on a lobbying trip to Tallahassee.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

A week after a gunman killed 17 people at a Florida high school, students who survived the attack brought their #NeverAgain protest movement to Tallahassee to demand action on guns and mental health. Thousands of activists marched on the state Capitol to pressure lawmakers Wednesday, even as their peers elsewhere in the U.S. staged protests of their own in solidarity.

Stoneman Shooting Survivors
Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

 

Students who survived the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School vowed to make sure that their 17 classmates and teachers did not die in vain. 

 

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

At the request of Florida's governor, mental health experts, educators and law enforcement professionals met Tuesday in Tallahassee at workshops following last week’s school shooting.

The main goal of these gatherings is to identify measures that can be taken before the end of the legislative session to improve safety in schools, gun control and resources for mental health. The last day of the session is March 9.

The warnings around Nikolas Cruz seemed to flash like neon signs: expelled from school, fighting with classmates, a fascination with weapons and hurting animals, disturbing images and comments posted to social media, previous mental health treatment.

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

President Trump is facing calls to act in the wake of the latest mass shooting, which killed 17 people Wednesday at a high school in Florida, and the White House is not ignoring them. The president will participate in a pair of listening sessions on school safety this week, and on Monday morning the White House said he supports efforts to improve the federal background check system, something Congress has expressed broad support for without acting on after past shootings.

South Broward High School Students Fear They Could Be Next

Feb 16, 2018
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Students at South Broward High School in Hollywood organized a gun control protest outside school grounds Friday, two days after a gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, killing 17 people.

From the morning bell at 8 a.m. till past the last bell of the day, students and a few faculty members held posters and chanted, “It could have been us” and “It can still be us.”

South Broward is about half an hour away from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where a 19-year-old opened fire on Wednesday, killing 17.

A gun bill that’s had some problems in the Florida Senate this legislative session has passed its first House committee.

Updated at 10:14 a.m. ET

A bipartisan measure aimed at improving background checks for gun sales has been introduced in the Senate, following a mass shooting in Texas that officials say might have been prevented if the gunman's conviction on assault charges had been flagged in a national database.

A new poll released Tuesday finds 52 percent of registered voters in Florida oppose prohibiting the sale of assault weapons and large capacity ammunition magazines, with 42 percent supporting a prohibition.

José A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo joins us for a conversation about Puerto Rico, DACA, and the Las Vegas mass shooting - and the need for "sensible gun policy."

Then we hear from Marine Col. Michael Samarov about recovery efforts in Dominica and the Leeward Islands.

Florida gun control advocates say a new report on gun theft by the Center for American Progress underscores the need for stricter laws.  The left-leaning group estimates 80,000 guns were stolen from individual owners in Florida between 2012 and 2013.

Taxpayers are on the hook for slightly more than $1 million in legal fees after the state lost its battle to defend the controversial “Docs versus Glocks” law.

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