history

It's been 521 years since the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus "sailed the ocean blue/in fourteen hundred and ninety-two." Since then, there have been thousands of parades, speeches and statues commemorating Columbus, along with a critical rethinking of his life and legacy.

But the question remains, how did a man who never set foot on North America get a federal holiday in his name? While Columbus did arrive in the "New World" when he cast anchor in the Bahamas, he never made it to the United States.

Was The Miami Trial Of The Cuban Five Fair?

Sep 20, 2013
Elaine Chen

On a special edition of The Florida Roundup, we discuss the controversial case of the Cuban Five, Cuban agents who were convicted in 2001 of espionage along with other charges.

In Cuba, they are called heroes, their faces on billboards across the island country. In the U.S., they are relatively unknown spies.  

Wilson Sayre

At a solemn ceremony today, the North Campus of Miami Dade College dedicated a new memorial to honor those lost in the attacks on 9/11. 

The memorial is about 10 feet high. On top of the base, which is supposed to represent the Pentagon, there is a granite column with three sides. Each side has the name of a place that was attacked on Sept. 11 along with a quote of remembrance. On top of the column is a two foot piece of what looks like an I-beam with a large nail sticking out of it. 

The year was 1995 and the place is on the cusp of a dilapidated downtown Miami at Northeast 14th Street and Biscayne Boulevard: parking lots located next to empty lots and patches of dusty grass that were home to those who had no other -- prostitutes, drug addicts, alcoholics and those who had simply given up.

It was back when the euphemism for Miami was South Florida, because like many a crime-ridden city, very few wanted to claim the name anymore.

William A. Fishbaugh (State Archives of Florida)

In Miami, everything has to do with migration, especially our food.

Rick Bravo via National Trust For Historic Preservation

Advocates for the Miami Marine Stadium have received what they say will be a decisive moment in the effort to renovate and expand the stadium.

The Miami City Commission has approved a unanimous recommendation from a citizens steering committee, asking that the city designate the needed area surrounding the stadium for a future park's use. Lands are to be under the control of Friends of the Miami Marine Stadium, a group whose sole purpose is to renovate the dilapidated stadium, which has been closed since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Michael Stephen McFarland via National Trust For Historic Preservation

This story was originally posted in July. Shortly after, the Miami City Commission voted to allow efforts to save the stadium and designate the surrounding area a park. But the clock's ticking. 

Work Of Florida's 'Highwaymen' Gets A New Life

Jul 9, 2013

Florida’s natural world, like its social world, is of many minds: serene, clear, or bright one minute, then dark, indignant, or utterly furious the next. And sometimes it’s a quixotic mix. 

Florida State Archives

This weekend, a devoted national and international crowd of devoted tiki-philes descends on Fort Lauderdale for The Hukilau. The annual gathering celebrates the music, history, and, of course, cocktails, associated with American midcentury tiki culture.

@Matt_Roy on Instagram

Did you know that if you dig deep enough into the property records of any piece of real estate in the state of Florida you will find that all the land originally belonged to the Spanish Crown?

But ever since the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1821, land ownership has been like a hot potato, changing hands incessantly.  Indeed, taking a deep look into any one piece of property (likely where you live, included) will reveal a surreal story for the ages.

New Plan Preserves Jackie Gleason Theater In Miami Beach

Apr 24, 2013
facebook.com/SaveTheFillmore

One of the most contentious aspects of the plan to redevelop the Miami Beach Convention Center has been settled: The Fillmore Miami Beach at the Jackie Gleason Theater will stay.

The theater had been slated for demolition by Portman-CMC, one of the two teams still in the running for the massive overhaul project. But with music and history lovers lined up in support of saving the theater, the team said that its plan has changed.

“We listened to the community,” said Jack Portman, vice chairman of Portman Holdings and John Portman & Associates.

via www.booksandbooks.com

03/05/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents is with journalist T.D. Allman.  His latest work is a ten-year project to create  FINDING FLORIDA:  The True History of the Sunshine State.  The 500-year recorded history of the Sunshine State is rife with myths and outright deceit.  Ponce de Leon did not “discover” Florida, nor did he search for a “Fountain of Youth.”  He sought gold . . . but there wasn’t any.  The revered Seminole figure, Osceola, was actually a mostly white man, named William Powell.  Allman says Florida’s legacy is mostly “sugar-coated.”  That’s Topical Currents Tuesday at 1pm, rebroadcast at 7pm on WLRN-HD2.

T.D. Allman South Florida Appearances: 

David Armitage

03/04/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with Harvard history professor Joyce Chaplin, author of ‘Round About the Earth:  Circumnavigation From Magellan to Orbit.  Humans have circled the globe for some 500 years.  Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gargarin was the first to achieve the feat by spacecraft.

Viter Juste, founder of 'Little Haiti,' Dies at 87

Nov 30, 2012
Carl Juste

"Little Haiti" has lost perhaps the man who could be called its father and the man who is credited for the name.

Viter Juste has died at the age of 87.

He was born in La Gonaive, Haiti in 1924 and after first going to New York, he and his family made their way to Miami in 1973.

He started with a house in Buena Vista and a record store in downtown Miami, "Les Cousins."

That led to creating the first Haitian newspaper for the growing community,  Haitian Florida and the Haitian American Community Association of Dade.

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