Hurricane Irma

Florida will get a one-time boost in tax money as residents across the state slowly rebuild from the devastation of Hurricane Irma.

Hurricane victims don’t have to repair their homes or find new places to live alone. Hurricane Irma survivors in Florida who are getting FEMA help have many federal and state resources available to further support their recovery.

Hollywood Hills Nursing Home Files Public Records Care

Feb 5, 2018
AP

A Broward County nursing home where residents died after Hurricane Irma has filed a public-records lawsuit alleging that the Florida Department of Health improperly refused to provide copies of death certificates from across the state.

The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills requested all death certificates from Sept. 9 through Sept. 16, with the request not including cause-of-death information, according to the lawsuit filed last week in Leon County circuit court.

Irma hit Florida on Sept. 10 and caused massive damage as it barreled up the state.

Health care in the U.S. Virgin Islands remains in a critical state, five months after Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria pummeled the region.

The only hospital on St. Thomas, the Schneider Regional Medical Center, serves some 55,000 residents between the islands of St. Thomas and St. John. Schneider's facilities suffered major structural damage, forcing a decrease in its range of services, mass transfers of its patients, staff departures and significant losses in revenue. Only about one-third of the beds are currently available for patient care.

Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald / WLRN

A pathologist with the Broward County Medical Examiner's Office testified for five hours. He saw the bodies and relived the autopsy reports in front of the courtroom. 

paramedic testified that he is haunted by the deaths. 

The Fire Rescue lieutenant said she believed the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills staff were "panicked" and "overwhelmed."

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

In a lot of ways life has returned to normal in most of the Florida Keys. But one major institution – a hospital – is still operating out of temporary quarters after Hurricane Irma. 

Gwen Filosa / Keynoter

The only organization providing hospice care in the Lower Keys is closing.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

On an unseasonably cool day in the Florida Keys, a manatee drifted through a canal, stopping occasionally to graze on an algae-slimed recreational vehicle that just barely crested the water’s surface.

That sunken RV is just one of 16 swept from the adjacent streets by Hurricane Irma in September. This 18-foot deep canal — filled with more wrecked homes than bobbing boats — is just one of hundreds in the island chain still clogged with storm trash.

But a canal clean-up in the Keys could finally be near.

Tom Hudson

A month after Hurricane Irma filled his mobile home with 17 inches of flood water, Brian Branigan received a permit from Monroe County to replace his home's drywall and flooring. By early December, the drywall had been replaced and new plywood had been laid. He expects to start putting in the linoleum floor this week with the hopes of moving back into the home before the end of the month.

"My home is modest," he said. "It's just a mobile home, but it's home. It's not a house."

FKAA

An aging reverse-osmosis plant proved its worth in the wake of Hurricane Irma, says the Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority’s chief executive.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Plenty of people in the Florida Keys have opinions about how Monroe County handled the response to Hurricane Irma.

Starting Jan. 8, residents can deliver those opinions directly in a series of six public meetings along the island chain.

The idea is to hear what went well, what went badly and to get suggestions for the future, said Martin Senterfitt, Monroe’s director of emergency management.

“The community deserves the right to give their input on the quality of service they witnessed,” he said. “We always have to remember at the end of the day who we work for.”

FPL Delays Plan To Recoup Irma Costs

Jan 3, 2018
power lines FPL
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

After saying in October it expected to collect an estimated $1.3 billion, Florida Power & Light has put on hold a plan to bill customers for the costs of restoring electricity after Hurricane Irma.

WLRN/Miami Herald

A lot has happened in the past 365 days.

A Category 4 hurricane plowed across the Florida Keys. President Obama ended the “wet foot, dry foot” policy for Cubans. The death toll related to Florida's opioid epidemic climbed higher. Venezuela sank further into economic and social chaos.

For the last episode of The Florida Roundup in 2017, editorial page editors from the Miami Herald, the Sun Sentinel and the Palm Beach Post — Nancy Ancrum, Rosemary O’Hara and Rick Christie — sat down with WLRN's Tom Hudson to review the year’s biggest news stories. 

NOAA/NASA

It’s easy to see the effects of Hurricane Irma on land in the Florida Keys. But the impacts underwater were also significant — and may last longer.

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