Hurricane Matthew

Tenants' Rights In The Face Of A Storm

Sep 5, 2017
Associated Press

Forty-two percent of all South Floridians rent their homes. And as it turns out, there’s not a whole lot of obligation for landlords to help tenants prepare for a coming storm.

Courtesy Food for the Poor


FPL
Florida Power & Light Company / WLRN

Whether they took the brunt of Hurricane Matthew or experienced a rainy breeze, Florida Power & Light (FPL) customers will spend the next year paying for the utility's response to the early October storm.

The state Public Service Commission on Tuesday approved --- with little comment --- a $318.5 million request by FPL to cover the costs of restoring power after the storm pummeled parts of the East Coast. Part of the money also will help the company replenish its storm reserve fund, which stood at $93.1 million before Matthew.

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<a href="https://twitter.com/UNHaiti/status/805826804497993728">Nations Unies Haïti</a>

It was seven years ago today, at 4:53 p.m., that Haiti was violently shaken. In just 35 seconds, the 7.0 earthquake destroyed much of the nation’s capital, Port-au-Prince, and claimed more than 200,000 lives.

Just over three months ago, on Oct. 4, Hurricane Matthew dealt another devastating blow to the country. The Category 4 storm’s 145-mph winds tore through Haiti’s southern peninsula, washing away farmland — one of the island nation's “breadbaskets” — along with vast swaths of homes and trees, and killing hundreds of people.

Florida Power and Light is asking the state for a temporary rate hike to recover costs from Hurricane Matthew. FPL says in the wake of the storm it deployed thousands of employees and contract workers, and replaced more than 250 miles of wire, 900 transformers and 400 poles. To cover those costs, it’s asking the state Public Service Commission to allow a temporary charge that adds up to $3.36 a month for the average residential customer.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

“How long have you been in pain?” asks Nurse Marsha Eloi, sitting in a makeshift health clinic in Camp Perrin, one of dozens of towns visited by the wreckage of Hurricane Matthew earlier this month.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Thirteen-year-old Ivana Fenelon walked up to me outside a church and primary school in Camp Perrin the week after Hurricane Matthew had leveled most of the homes in Pérénie, the rural hamlet where she lives with her family, a three-hour walk into the mountains. “I want to talk too,” she said, as I finished an interview about the hurricane with a farmer from another nearby town.

“What he’s saying is important,” she explained. “There must be some things that are very painful for him that he’s telling you about, so I’ll talk too.”

The Sunshine Economy: Haiti, Help And Hurricane Matthew

Oct 24, 2016
Rowan Moore Gerety

Drive down on Lucy Street in Homestead, take a right at a school painted pink, then a left at the stop sign and you will find yourself surrounded by Haitians in a horseshoe-shaped apartment complex. They've come to Homestead, most of them from Southern Haiti, the same mountainous peninsula that was hit by Hurricane Matthew Oct. 4.

Rowan Moore Gerety WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

On Thursday, Governor Rick Scott announced that at least five people had contracted the Zika virus in Miami's Little River neighborhood. Now, there's a new Zika zone in the county, between Northwest 79th and 63rd Streets from Northwest 10th Avenue to North Miami Avenue. We get the latest from WLRN's health reporter Sammy Mack

Listen here: 

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Some of Hurricane Matthew's most gut-wrenching stories are coming out of the coastal city of Jérémie on Haiti's southwest peninsula – the region hardest hit.

Rowan Moore Gerety WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup…

Hurricane Matthew is the first Category 5 Atlantic hurricane since Hurricane Felix in 2007. Fortunately, dire predictions for South Florida did not come to pass on Thursday as the storm stayed off shore. We check in with FPL and WLRN's correspondents out in the field to see what the aftermath looks like. 

@vanillaice

Despite Governor Rick Scott telling Floridians to "evacuate, evacuate, evacuate" before Hurricane Matthew was expected to hit, not all who live in evacuation zones heeded his warnings

One such South Florida resident was Robert Matthew Van Winkle, also known as rapper Vanilla Ice. 

Ice, who's responsible for the 90's anthem "Ice, Ice, Baby" has had a rough week.

Tuesday evening he was booted off the television dancing competition Dancing With The Stars.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Projections are still holding that Hurricane Matthew may circle back towards South Florida after a near miss this week.

And there’s some concern from officials that this first miss may have a lasting impact on future storm preparations, preparations, that have dotted South Beach with sand bands and odd pieces of plywood.

The entire front of Cheeseburger Baby on Washington Avenue in South Beach is covered in plywood. Beside a makeshift door also made of plywood, “Yo! We’re open” is written in pink spray paint.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

When a storm looks like it's going to hit the region you cover as a reporter, it's probably a good idea to be there.

Slight problem:  I was still in North Carolina the day Hurricane Matthew was set to pummel South Florida. So I enlisted a friend's help to get to South Florida in time to cover the storm.

Step one was getting a flight to Orlando. I got a couple of strange looks when I showed up at the airport willing to travel to an area under a hurricane warning. 

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nearly 300 emergency management personnel reported for duty at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center Thursday—all expecting hot meals and working air conditioning along with high-speed internet and a clean place to use the bathroom.

There’s a whole team that contributes to that effort. The woman in charge is Adrienne Britto, who walks the floors with a green blouse and a keen eye for detail.

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