hurricane season

Bad Hurricane News In Revised NOAA Forecast

Aug 8, 2019
NOAA

The peak of hurricane season may produce more dangerous storms than originally predicted, federal hurricane forecasters said Thursday, as oceanic and atmospheric conditions become more favorable for the production of hurricanes.

The most active part of the hurricane season are the months of August, September, and October. In this “State of the Season” report, we will assess trends in atmospheric and oceanic conditions around the globe that may lend clues on how the waters could behave over the next few weeks.

The Season So Far

Hurricane Center Now Says 70% Chance Of Tropical Cyclone In Atlantic

Aug 1, 2019
National Hurricane Center

The chances keep increasing for a tropical wave moving across the far eastern Atlantic Ocean to strengthen into a cyclone over the next five days, the National Hurricane Center said in its latest advisory.

Currently known as Disturbance No. 2, it has a 70% chance of forming over the next five days, according to the 8 p.m. advisory.

That was a 10% jump up from 60% earlier in the afternoon.

Read more at the Sun Sentinel.

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

A disturbance in the Caribbean could drop serious rain on Puerto Rico, Haiti and the Dominican Republic by midweek before proceeding to South Florida, according to the National Weather Service’s forecast.

But the chances it gets to South Florida as more than the garden variety summer storm are minimal. The service’s Tropical Weather Outlook puts the chance of the disturbance forming into even a tropical depression at 10 percent by midday Tuesday and only 20 percent by midday Friday.

The National Hurricane Center has classified the tropical low over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico as a “potential tropical cyclone” (PTC), and it could become a hurricane before hitting Louisiana this weekend.

NASA

Two years ago, it looked as if Hurricane Irma would make a direct hit to South Florida. Hundreds of thousands of people were ordered to leave their homes. Many did and found emergency shelters with no room and gridlocked traffic.

Gerard Albert / WLRN

Broward County wants residents to be ready for the next big storm.

The county's emergency site, broward.org/emergency, has public safety information that can help during an emergency.

Tracy Jackson is the director of regional emergency services and communications for Broward County. He says his team learned from Hurricane Irma in 2017 and being prepared is the first step for staying safe during a storm.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Weather officials have been able to reduce forecasting errors for a hurricane's track, including its "cone of uncertainty," in the last 20 years. But more research is needed to better predict how intense a storm will be.

That's according to National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham, who spoke on a panel Thursday at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center in Plantation. 

Mayor Mc Ginn / Courtesy

A little nudging for storm prep shouldn’t be necessary after Matthew battered Florida’s east coast in 2016, Irma essentially drenched the entire state in 2017, and Michael ground up a chunk of the Panhandle last year.

Frederica Wilson
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

When Hurricane Irma made landfall in South Florida nearly two years ago, it knocked out power across the region — in some areas for up to 10 days. A dozen people in the Rehabilitation Center At Hollywood Hills died after the storm, due to heat-related issues from lack of air-conditioning.

Al Diaz/Miami Herald

As Michael churned toward the coast last October, forecasters feared the compact hurricane would blossom into a fierce storm far worse than their projections.

But what they weren't able to predict were Michael's three rapid explosions of power that ultimately made it the first Cat 5 hurricane to make landfall since 1992's lethal Hurricane Andrew and one of only four to ever hit the U.S. While track forecasts have vastly improved, predicting intensity remains a challenge.

Many residents in the southeast U.S. and along the Gulf Coast are already thinking about the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. Last year brought two of the most destructive storms to ever hit the U.S.: Hurricane Florence and Hurricane Michael.

Lawmakers Eye 'Long, Long Recovery' From Hurricane

Jan 7, 2019
Getty Images

Hurricane Michael, which pummeled 10 Panhandle counties and spurred evacuation orders for 375,000 Floridians in October, left nearly seven times the debris of Hurricane Irma, which barreled across 45 counties in 2017.

And in the three months since Michael came ashore at Mexico Beach, debris continues to be picked up, more than 102,000 people have registered for assistance and 16 counties have qualified for federal aid.

Brock Long was frustrated. Yet again, the FEMA administrator said, people in the path of a powerful hurricane had ignored evacuation orders.

Hurricane Michael had leveled the small Florida city of Mexico Beach and destroyed large parts of nearby Panama City. The death count was rising as search and rescue workers pulled bodies from the rubble.

In Mexico Beach, Fla., Lance Erwin is one of the lucky ones. His house is still standing. He stayed in his home during Hurricane Michael, several blocks from the beach, in a part of his house that he calls his "safe room."

"The garage door was shaking," he says. "I knew the roof was gone at that point because everything was shaking. I thought, 'Just hang in there.' I had faith everything was going to be OK."

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