Jupiter

Madeline Fox / WLRN

Walking the trails around the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse area, it’s easy to see why the site’s manager describes the role as his dream job.

He's been working there for six years, and remembers its individual plants in precise detail. 

"I remember when this mangrove used to sit on the fringe, and now it's 10, 11 feet out there on its own little clump," he says, gesturing. Further down the trail, he points out sand pine scrub and hardwood hammock ecosystems that he's seen flourish over the years. 

Courtesy Peter DeWitt / Bureau of Land Management

The shoreline surrounding the iconic Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse is falling away at an accelerated rate.

Over the holiday season, vandalism and unauthorized use of the dunes along the shoreline put the lighthouse area on track for erosion to go up even more than its already stepped-up pace of seven feet per year over the last ten years, up from its historical average of two feet per year.

Courtesy Jerry Thomas Elementary PTO

Vending machines in school cafeterias aren’t always a huge hit with parents. They usually hold chips, cookies, sugary drinks and other snacks that worry health-conscious adults.

The vending machine in Jerry Thomas Elementary’s cafeteria, on the other hand, is doling out something that all parents can get behind – books.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

It was a beautiful Tuesday morning at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse. The sun was sparkling off the clear blue water, a light breeze was stirring through the native trees and plants, and – notably – children in matching polos were bouncing up and down with excitement about climbing the historic red tower.

“Look at all of them in their little red shirts,” said Jamie Stuve, who oversees the lighthouse area’s historical functions as the president and CEO of the Loxahatchee River Historical Society. “They love it, that makes me so happy.”

Madeline Fox / WLRN

A public meeting Monday night in Jupiter about the Brightline/Virgin Trains’s northward expansion turned tense as residents voiced concerns about noise, construction closures and unforeseen costs.

Associated Press via Palm Beach Post

On July 3, the town of Jupiter cautioned on Facebook that its offer for free Uber rides this Fourth of July weekend would only be available on a “first come, first serve basis” and could sell out quickly.

BONNIE GROSS via Miami Herald

The town of Jupiter is banning fertilizer use during the rainy season to keep nitrogen and phosphorus out of local bodies of water.

Starting this Saturday, residents and commercial property owners won’t be able to use commonly available fertilizers until October.

The ban passed last November, and is being put into effect for the first time on June 1. It applies to residential properties and some commercial areas. Farms, golf courses and other specialty turf fields, like athletic fields, are exempt.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

People who live around the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse don’t want to see it slip away – literally or figuratively.

The 120 acres surrounding the towering red landmark have been under the stewardship of the federal Bureau of Land Management, in conjunction with local groups and jurisdictions, since 2008. The BLM’s work on the site – fighting back nonnative weeds, laying out trails, shoring up shoreline – has been dictated by the same 10-year-plan since 2010.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

As South Florida communities search for ways to combat sea level rise, efforts to improve flood drainage in the town of Jupiter have saved residents about $500,000 in flood insurance costs over the past year, according to the town’s utility services manager.

The National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System reduces flood insurance premiums in municipalities across the country that undertake floodplain management activities.

Scientists are about to get an up-close and personal look at the planet Jupiter's most famous landmark, the Great Red Spot.

NASA's Juno spacecraft will be directly over the spot shortly after 10 p.m. ET Monday, July 10, about 5,600 miles above the gas giant's cloud tops. That's closer than any spacecraft has been before.

The spot is actually a giant storm that has been blowing on Jupiter for centuries. It's huge, larger than Earth in diameter.

NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

A Hate Crime Haunts Jupiter And Its Latino Community

Jul 13, 2015
Maria Murriel / WLRN

JUPITER, FLA. -- Onesimo Lopez-Ramos immigrated to the U.S. from Guatemala -- one of the most violent countries in the western hemisphere. But even living in the quiet town of Jupiter, Fla., at the northern end of Palm Beach County, he couldn't escape lethal brutality.

The 18-year-old Lopez-Ramos was killed this past April, allegedly by three young white men who said they were targeting immigrants -- or "Guat-hunting" as one of them told police afterward in a disturbing confession.

Courtesy photo / Maltz Jupiter Theatre

Sure, logging a stint with South Florida's largest theater company's rigorous high school mentorship program looks good on a college application. But the Maltz Jupiter Theatre's Youth Artists' Chair is about much more than beefing up a resume.