latino voters

Ariana Cubillos / AP

COMMENTARY

You could say I’ve got pandemic in my blood. My first American ancestor came to this country in 1665 escaping London’s bubonic plague, which killed a quarter of the city's population.

‘Have Faith In This President,’ Says Pence To Latinos In Florida

Jan 17, 2020
MATIAS J. OCNER / MIAMI HERALD

When it comes to courting Hispanic voters, Vice President Mike Pence might seem an unlikely candidate to serve as President Donald Trump’s top liaison. But while he isn’t bilingual, the deeply religious, born-again Pence speaks a language that matters: religion.

And so, wearing his faith on his tailored sleeve, Pence stood inside a Spanish-language church outside of Orlando on Thursday and gave a speech that book-ended talk of jobs, immigration, and military might with calls for those “who bow the head and bend the knee” to deliver another four years in office to Trump.

It's happening ... again. We have a presidential primary field full of candidates who (with one exception) aren't Latinx, trying to demonstrate how down they are with Hispanic and Latinx voters. Sure, politicians have to reach out to voters from across the cultural and racial spectrum — it's part of the job. But if that outreach is all style and little substance, it can come across as what some people call "Hispandering."

DANIEL A. VARELA / MIAMI HERALD

President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign launches an effort to court the Hispanic vote in Miami this week, but Florida Democrats are criticizing the attempt as a “repugnant, political act” that contradicts the political rhetoric and record of his first term.

A half-dozen Democratic Latino activists, gathered in an AFL-CIO office in Miami Springs on Monday afternoon, argued the afternoon before the Republican announcement that their communities should reject Trump’s candidacy wholesale.

Joshua Lim / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY -

So it seems the Orlando massacre helped prod Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, like a guy leaping back onto a subway train as its doors are closing, to change his mind Wednesday and run for reelection.

WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup: the White House directive to school districts about transgender students, political in-fighting among Democrats, the mobilization of Latino voters, and the Zika funding feud.

Kate Stein / WLRN

 

 

Norteño music developed along the Texas-Mexico border. It blends the instruments of mariachi with the rhythms of polka. And now, one of norteño's most popular bands is hoping its music will get more Latinos to the polls.

Los Tigres del Norte -- The Tigers of the North -- have been putting out norteño hits for four decades. The band performed in West Palm Beach on Feb. 19. A lot of its songs touch on social and political issues: immigration, workers' rights, drug trafficking, political representation.

Washington Post

Two presidential debates are coming to Miami this week.

Republican candidates will debate at the University of Miami Thursday night. But first, Democrats will take the stage Wednesday night at the Kendall campus of Miami Dade College.

Twenty-one mayors – most of them from South Florida – sent a letter to the moderators for both debates. The mayors want the candidates to explain how they plan to deal with climate change and sea level rise.

Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

Less than half of eligible Latino voters nationally will vote in the 2016 presidential elections, according to an analysis released this week by a nonpartisan Latino group.

 

The analysis, conducted by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, predicts a 17 percent increase in the number of Latinos who will vote in 2016, compared with 2012.

 

Mairy Reyes (right), a civic engagement officer with the nonprofit group Mi Familia Vota, registers students to vote at Colonial High School in Orlando, Fla.

Florida Roundup: Who Makes Up The Hispanic Vote?

Aug 31, 2015
Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

When Donald Trump kicked Univision anchor Jorge Ramos out of a press conference last week in Iowa, polls showed that Trump was lacking support among "Hispanic voters." 

What exactly does it mean to be a Hispanic voter, considering the vast differences between the groups that make up the Hispanic voter demographic?