law enforcement

Joe Cavaretta / South Florida Sun Sentinel

A state panel has voted unanimously to revoke the law enforcement accreditation of the Broward Sheriff’s Office, the largest sheriff’s office in Florida.

The loss of accreditation — a voluntary certification sought by law enforcement agencies — won’t affect BSO’s operations in a major way. But it is a further blow to the agency’s prestige at a time when a new command staff, including a new sheriff, are dealing with a string of failures and questionable conduct by deputies.

MIAMI HERALD

In his quest to get his old job back, Scott Israel spent hours jousting with Gov. Ron DeSantis’ lawyer Wednesday in a series of combative exchanges highlighting two deadly mass shootings in Broward County that led to the former sheriff’s suspension.

Israel’s seven hours of testimony Wednesday concluded a two-day hearing before a Senate special master in an appeal filed by the veteran law enforcement official after DeSantis stripped him of the sheriff’s post shortly after the Republican governor took office in January.

MIAMI HERALD

Stripped of his uniform and badge, ousted Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel for the first time made a direct appeal to a Senate special master Tuesday as he tries to get his job back after Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended him from office because of the mass shooting at a Parkland high school last year.

A North Miami police officer has been found guilty of culpable negligence but was acquitted by a jury on two more serious felonies in connection with a 2016 shooting that wounded the caretaker of a man with autism.

Officer Jonathan Aledda was found not guilty of two counts of attempted manslaughter in the shooting of Charles Kinsey, who was caring for Arnaldo Rios Soto, who has severe autism and had wandered away from his group home for mentally disabled adults.

The North Miami police officer accused of recklessly shooting at an autistic man holding a toy truck won’t be taking a plea deal.

Officer Jonathon Aledda, who wounded the autistic man’s unarmed caretaker in the controversial July 2016 shooting, on Monday rejected a proposed deal that called for no jail time, one year of probation and giving up his law-enforcement credential.

After Aledda rejected the plea deal, lawyers began picking a jury for the officer’s second trial. Jury selection should take most of the week.

For the picturesque college town of Durham in southeastern New Hampshire, a reckoning came in 2017.

That was the year a complaint about the cultural appropriation of Cinco de Mayo spiraled into weeks of racial unrest, a boiling over of tensions that had simmered for years at the University of New Hampshire. Students who called out racist incidents faced a backlash of online bullying, swastikas and slurs, and the vandalism of sculptures that symbolized their cause.

Jamie Doolittle / WLRN News

Parkland officials announced Friday they have decided to keep the Broward Sheriff's Office (BSO) as its law enforcement provider. This decision was made despite the heavy criticism the sheriff's office  faced after the Stoneman Douglas massacre.

The city of Parkland hired the Center for Public Safety to conduct a review of the city's policing options. The options included  the city establishing its own police department, partnering with another municipality or continuing its current relationship with BSO.

Screengrab police bodycam video

A Miami-Dade police officer who was caught on video throwing a young black woman to the ground and arresting her after she called for help is now facing charges from that incident. 

Teen arrest
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

A nationally recognized civil rights attorney has gotten involved in a case involving a Tamarac teen whose forceful arrest was captured in a video that went viral last week.

Ben Crump represented the family of Trayvon Martin after he was shot to death in 2012. Now he's representing 15 year-old Delucca Rolle, who was seen in the video being pepper sprayed by Broward Sheriff's Deputies. His head was repeatedly slammed against the pavement in a McDonald's parking lot.

Mike Stocker / South Florida Sun Sentinel

A week after an unarmed black teen was forcefully arrested by white deputies, nationally renowned civil rights attorney Ben Crump and NAACP leaders are calling for criminal charges to be filed against the cops.

Sherrilyn Cabrera / WLRN

Activists are calling for additional action against Officer Alejandro Giraldo of the Miami-Dade Police Department, who was caught on camera last month showing excessive force towards Dyma Loving, a 26-year-old black woman from South Miami-Dade.

Activists from two human rights organizations delivered petitions with over 50,000 signatures to State Attorney Katherine Rundle’s office Tuesday demanding that Giraldo be fired and charged with assault. 

Fort Lauderdale Police
Courtesy of the Fort Lauderdale Fraternal Order of Police. / WLRN

Twelve Fort Laurderdale police officers who died on active duty will be remembered and honored in a Fort Lauderdale ceremony Wednesday. Some died decades ago, as far back as the 1940s. 

The annual memorial will be held by the Fort Lauderdale Fraternal Order of Police, the union for the department.

Michael Tucker is a sergeant with the police department, and the president of the union. He said the ceremony is a way to remind people of the importance of the profession.

Sun Sentinel

A 15-year-old student met with his lawyer and prosecutors Tuesday just days after his head was slammed against the pavement in a forceful off-campus arrest that has drawn a public outcry.

The high-profile legal team representing Delucca “Lucca” Rolle, a student at J.P. Taravella High School, wants the charges against the teen dropped, as prosecutors confirmed they’re investigating the encounter between him and deputies.

Sun Sentinel

Broward sheriff’s deputies pepper-sprayed, tackled and punched teens while responding to an after-school call near J.P. Taravella High School on Thursday afternoon, video shot by a student shows.

The footage shows at least two deputies take a boy down, bang his forehead into the pavement and repeatedly punch him in the head.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

People who kill or seriously injure police dogs in Florida soon could face tougher penalties after the Senate unanimously passed a bill inspired by the shooting death of a canine named Fang.

The bill passed Wednesday would make that crime a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. It's now a third-degree felony punishable by up to five years in prison.

Republican Sen. Aaron Bean said his bill was inspired after Fang was "executed" in Jacksonville last year. The 3-year-old German shepherd was killed as police chased a 17-year-old carjacking suspect.

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