lawyers

Josh Ritchie / South Florida Sun Sentinel

W. George Allen, a hugely influential figure in Broward history and its black community, has died, his family confirmed Thursday. He was 83.

In 1962, Allen became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Florida. He once said: “I was admitted to Harvard and the University of California at Berkeley, but I’m a native Floridian, and I felt that somebody had to integrate the University of Florida. The racists told me I didn’t belong there and I’d never graduate.”

Via Miami Herald

To stem the exodus of poorly paid state-funded prosecutors and defense attorneys, Florida lawmakers earlier this year passed a law mandating starting pay of $50,000 a year.

But what was hailed as an important step in recruiting and keeping talented young lawyers may have an unintended, and dispiriting effect.

The FBI raids on Monday targeting President Trump's longtime personal attorney, Michael Cohen, sent a jolt through Washington and darkened the legal cloud hanging over the administration.

Trump lashed out at the Justice Department and special counsel Robert Mueller, telling reporters that "it's a disgraceful situation" and "an attack on our country."

On Tuesday, Trump zeroed in on a particular angle of the raid: the seizure of privileged communications between Cohen and his legal clients, the most prominent of whom, of course, is the president.

A Tallahassee defense lawyer finds it absurd that he has to disclose which experts he might call on in his case to the prosecutor. Current legal procedure forces attorneys working pro bono cases to do so.

South Floridian Takes Reins As Florida Bar President

Jul 10, 2017
Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Lawyers in Florida have a new leader - Michael Higer, a South Floridian has taken over as the Florida Bar's 69th president.

Higer is in his first month of a one-year term leading the 104,000 lawyers in the Florida Bar.

The Bar regulates the lawyers licensed to practice in Florida and provides training and services for its members. 

Creative Commons

How many people in South Florida represent themselves in court? How many people don’t have access a lawyer?

The short answer is we don’t know, but an effort by the Florida Bar Foundation is trying to change that with an initiative called Everyone Counts Day, which will be held on Monday in Miami-Dade County.

Throughout the day, lawyers will fan out to courtrooms across the county and count:

steve_sris/flickr

Tallahassee boasts one of the highest concentrations of lawyers in the country, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Many of those lawyers are in jobs that have nothing to do with being in a courtroom.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says more students are graduating from law school each year than there are jobs available.

Government Surveillance, Corporate Power and Public Resistance

Sep 9, 2013
https://twitter.com/HeidiBoghosian

 

A Profession in Crisis: The Lawyer Bubble

May 22, 2013
http://www.stevenjharper.com/

05/22/13 - Wednesday's Topical Currents is with attorney and law professor Steven Harper.  A successful attorney for over 30 years, he’s written about the troubled legal state in THE LAWYER BUBBLE:  A Profession in Crisis. Law schools graduate some 45,000 attorneys each year.  Most will be in debt $100,000 dollars from loans.