Maria Elvira Salazar

Joey Flechas / Miami Herald

Florida's 27th Congressional District has miles of coastline. The district stretches from near Black Pointe Marina in south Miami-Dade County to the Venetian Causeway, and all of Key Biscayne and Miami Beach.

"Whatever is going on in the rest of the country, we're not denying climate change," says Donna Shalala, the Democrat running for Congress in the district. "For us, it's life and death."

Miami Herald

In the battle over control of the U.S. House of Representatives, the race to replace the longest-serving member of the Florida Congressional delegation plays a big role. The campaign to succeed Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R) in Congress pits a veteran of Democratic politics and community leader against a political newcomer who is a former Spanish-language television news host.

 

Republican Maria Elvira Salazar and Democrat Donna Shalala are running in the 27th Congressional district in Miami-Dade County, but the outcome will echo across the region.

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COMMENTARY

As a registered independent, I neither supported nor opposed Maria Elvira Salazar’s Republican primary run for Congress from Florida’s 27th District, where I reside.

But there’s one thing about Salazar’s landslide victory on Tuesday that I’m unabashedly enthusiastic about. It may have finally driven a stake through the heart of one of South Florida’s most poisonous political practices: accusing your opponent of being soft on communist Cuba.

Miami Herald

Former television journalist Maria Elvira Salazar cruised into a victory for the Republican Party primary for the 27th Congressional District of Florida, winning 45.51 percent of the votes in a crowded race that had nine candidates.

Salazar stepped into the victory party to blaring salsa in the heavily Cuban-American Westchester neighborhood, holding the hand of soon-to-be-retiring Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who has held the seat for decades.