Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Alyssa’s Law, Requiring Panic Alarms In Schools, Heads To Governor’s Desk

Mar 11, 2020
Bobby Caina Calvan / AP

A bill named after a 14-year-old girl killed in the Parkland massacre that will require panic alarms in the state’s schools is heading to the governor’s desk.

The Florida Senate gave final approval Tuesday night to Alyssa’s Law as her mother Lori Alhadeff watched from the gallery.

Alhadeff said she made eight trips to Tallahassee to advocate for the legislation, which was sponsored by Sen. Lauren Book, D-Plantation, and Reps. Michael Gottlieb, D-Davie, and Dan Daley, D-Coral Springs.

Brynn Anderson / AP

It's been two years since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Maria Esquinca

On the eve of the two-year anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, community members attended the book launch of If I Don’t Make It, I Love You: Survivors in the Aftermath of School Shootings at Broward College. 

The anthology is a compilation of work from more than 80 survivors of school shootings. The book spans 52 years and begins with first-person narratives of the Santa Fe High School shooting in 2018 and ends with accounts from the University of Texas Tower shooting in 1966. 

More Parkland Parents Sue FBI Over Botched Tips About School Shooter

Feb 14, 2020
Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

Another set of parents are suing the FBI over how the agency botched tips about the Parkland shooter, leading to their child’s death in the 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High.

Andrew Pollack and Shara Kaplan, the parents of Meadow Pollack, who was 17 when she was shot a total of nine times during the massacre, filed their lawsuit against the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Wednesday in Fort Lauderdale federal court.

Emily Taguchi and Stephanie Walsh / ABC Documentaries

Feb. 14 marks two years since 16 students and one teacher at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were killed on campus. Since the tragedy, students have organized nationwide protests focused on gun violence, successfully lobbied for legislation in the Florida legislature over school safety and started the next chapter of their lives in college and beyond. The upcoming ABC News documentary, "After Parkland," explores how the parents and students have recovered from the tragedy and were inspired to take action in very different ways.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

When students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High walk into their new building next school year, the school district says they’ll enter a structure that’s setting the new standard for security in Broward County schools.

Sun Sentinel via press pool / WLRN

The confessed Parkland shooter was back in a Broward County courtroom Thursday afternoon for his last scheduled hearing of 2019. He wore large glasses and sat with his attorneys in the courtroom.

Nikolas Cruz's trial will not begin in January of 2020 as it was scheduled to. Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer postponed the start of the trial until at least the summer of 2020.

Nikolas Cruz
Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, Pool / WLRN

The next hearing in the case of the confessed Parkland shooter is scheduled for Thursday.

Broward Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer is expected to consider a defense motion to delay the trial of Nikolas Cruz, who faces 17 charges of first degree murder and 17 charges of attempted murder for the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The trial is currently slated to begin with jury selection on Jan. 27.

How Many Teachers Are Carrying Guns In Florida? State Keeping It Under Wraps

Dec 12, 2019

Republican lawmakers who pushed to allow teachers to carry guns in schools say they do not need to know how many Florida teachers are armed and participating in the so-called guardian program.

Joe Cavaretta / Sun Sentinel

Broward County rose as an example of flawed emergency communications, under-reported student issues and last-second scrambles to comply with statewide school-safety laws in a statewide grand jury report released late Wednesday.

The 18-page report zeroes in on Broward County while suggesting recommendations for districts statewide. It strikes an incredulous tone in its blast of of slow-to-comply school districts.

“There is no conceivable set of circumstances,” the report said, “that any Florida school, charter or not, should be unprepared to comply.”

courtesy of Lori Alhadeff

Legislation named in honor of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff, who was one of 17 people who died in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas School, would require silent panic alarms in every public school building in Florida to alert police and rescuers to emergencies.

“We need to create layers and layers of protection to help keep our schools safe,” said Lori Alhadeff, Alyssa’s mother. “Alyssa’s Law, these silent panic alarms, is another layer of protection to help save lives.”

MSD
Jenna Harris/The Eagle Eye / WLRN

The varsity football team at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School almost had an undefeated regular football season. Almost. The Eagles lost to the Plantation High Colonels last week 39-10. 

However, the team won its first eight games of the season and is still going to the playoffs this week. The first game, against Miami High, kicks off at 7:30 at Cumber Stadium in Parkland.

MIAMI HERALD file

One of the three assistant principals who were reassigned as a demonstration of accountability after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has been cleared of wrongdoing by a school district investigation.

Assistant Principal Winfred Porter Jr., along with other colleagues, was reassigned a year ago to a district office. The move came shortly after Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie promised disciplinary action tied to the district’s perceived failure to penalize anyone but a few low-level employees.

Lynne Sladky / AP

Former Broward Deputy Scot Peterson can’t be held criminally responsible for failing to stop the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School because the state has already pinned the blame on his boss, ousted Sheriff Scott Israel, Peterson’s lawyers argued Tuesday.

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