Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting

In response to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting that killed 17 people, Florida lawmakers passed a law in March requiring all schools in the state to have at least one armed and trained law enforcement officer or "school guardian."

The brother of Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz will be allowed to start a new life — out of state, with a new home and job.

A Broward judge allowed 18-year-old Zachary Cruz, who is under court supervision for trespassing at the school his brother attacked, to transfer his probation to Virginia. That's where he'll be under the care of Nexus Services, a company that says its helps people rebuild their lives after incarceration.

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel

Since his older brother Nikolas Cruz opened fire on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School killing 17 students and staff members, Zachary Cruz has been arrested twice, kicked out of his home and doesn't have a job or a license.

His attorney is now asking a judge to give the 18-year-old a chance at a new life in Virginia where he's been offered a home, a job and counseling.

Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office is asking a Leon County circuit judge to dismiss a lawsuit that alleges a recently approved ban on firearm “bump stocks” is an unconstitutional taking of property. 

Washed Ashore

Guests for Sundial for Tuesday, May 8, 2018:

 

Ryan Petty is the father of Alaina Petty, one of the victims of the Parkland shooting. He sits on the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission, which had its first meeting last month. On Sundial, Petty discussed what happened at the meeting and the process of making high schools safer for students.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

On the afternoon of Feb. 14, Fawn Patterson got a call from her daughter telling her to come to the hospital.

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie is facing questions about honesty and transparency – so much so that he opened a community forum Monday by stating that he was not a liar.

Charles Trainor Jr.

Broward County is taking a closer look at how schools address punishment amid criticism that its controversial PROMISE program encouraged a culture of lax discipline throughout the district.

CARL JUSTE / Miami Herald

Superintendent Robert Runcie opened a community forum on Monday night by saying he’s not a liar.

“There are some out there that are concerned that somehow we misled the public. Some will say we lied. I mean, I’ve heard all of it,” Runcie said during a “workshop” on a disciplinary program known as PROMISE.

TNS (via Miami Herald)

After denying for months that Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz had any connection to a program created to soften school punishment and reduce student arrests — and characterizing assertions to the contrary as "fake news" — the Broward County school district is now acknowledging that Cruz was in fact referred to its PROMISE program.

AP via Miami Herald

When Meadow Pollack died, she had nine bullets in her petite body.

The Parkland shooting victim was one of 17 students and educators killed Feb. 14 when confessed gunman Nikolas Cruz shot up the halls of Parkland's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School with an assault-style weapon.

Not far away was Scot Peterson, a Broward Sheriff’s Office deputy and Stoneman's school resource officer who heard the shooting, but stood outside the building as Cruz opened fire on his classmates.

Nikolas Cruz
Sun Sentinel

Nikolas Cruz, the confessed-shooter in the Parkland school massacre, had a short hearing on Friday. 

Cruz was again very silent, with his head down, as he has been at all of his previous court appearances. His team of public defenders announced he is waiving his right to a speedy trial.

 


One of the parents to address the investigating commission was Fred Guttenberg, shown here speaking at an event on April 9, who lost his daughter Jaime during the Feb. 14 shooting at Stoneman Douglas High.
Associated Press

Parents of teenagers who were murdered on Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School asked a commission tasked with investigating the massacre to report any findings that could help make schools safer as quickly as possible.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

A 16-member commission will begin reviewing on Tuesday the Feb. 14 mass shooting at a Broward County high school, looking into the circumstances of the crime, the background of the alleged shooter and recommendations to prevent future tragedies.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission, which was created as part of a sweeping school-safety law (SB 7026) signed by Gov. Rick Scott last month, will hold its initial meeting at the Broward College campus in Coconut Creek. 

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