mass shooting

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

Monday night's rain was not an obstacle for more than a hundred people who showed up at  Betti Stradling Park in Coral Springs, just five minutes from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, to participate in one of the several candlelight vigils organized by the Florida Parent Teacher Association (PTA) around the state to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting. 

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel via Miami Herald

After last week’s school shooting in Parkland that killed 17 people, a lot of focus has fallen on the home where the confessed shooter was living. WLRN spoke with the father of that family about the young man’s mental health issues – and about issues of gun ownership.

As the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting are being remembered across South Florida this week, hundreds from the Parkland community came to remember 14-year-old Jaime Guttenberg on Sunday, as well as 15 year-old Luke Hoyer and 14-year old Alaina Petty on Monday morning. 

 

Nikolas Cruz
Sun Sentinel / WLRN

Shackled and wearing a red jump suit, school shooter Nikolas Cruz made his first live appearance in a Broward County circuit court five days after he walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High and fatally shot 17 people in the worst school shooting in Florida history.

Cruz, a slightly built teen, did not say anything and never looked up at the crowd from his seat at the defense table. It was a tense atmosphere — Cruz was surrounded by Broward Sheriff’s deputies as media members and other lawyers watched from the gallery.

Teresa Frontado

The grief and mourning continue for the 17 dead students and staff killed in last week’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. But something else is happening among the anguish of the interrupted lives of the victims and survivors. Out of the agony — activism.

 

Susan Atocker / Sun Sentinel

When James and Kimberly Snead took in Nikolas Cruz late last year, he was a socially awkward teenager lost in the world, depressed by the death of his beloved mother.

But to the Sneads, Cruz appeared to be progressing.

The young man who had been friendly with their son regularly attended adult-education classes, bicycled to his job as a cashier and watched TV shows with the family. Cruz hoped to become an infantry soldier. With the Sneads’ help, the emotionally troubled 19-year-old planned to resume mental-health therapy begun years earlier.

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

President Trump is facing calls to act in the wake of the latest mass shooting, which killed 17 people Wednesday at a high school in Florida, and the White House is not ignoring them. The president will participate in a pair of listening sessions on school safety this week, and on Monday morning the White House said he supports efforts to improve the federal background check system, something Congress has expressed broad support for without acting on after past shootings.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

They are angry. They are channeling their pain and stepping into the harsh spotlight of a heated and ongoing national debate. They are shielding their peers who feel too devastated to do the same.

For the more than 3,000 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Wednesday's mass shooting was terrifying and life-changing. But what of the tens of millions of other children, in schools across the country, who have since heard about what happened and now struggle with their own feelings of fear, confusion and uncertainty?

While Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School was on lockdown, with an active shooter in the building, students were on their phones.

Scott Israel
Peter Haden / WLRN

The FBI ignored a tip last month that the accused Majory Stoneman Douglas High School killer was dangerous and at risk of committing a school shooting.

Seventeen people died in the attack.

Susan Walsh / AP

President Donald Trump has met with victims of a school shooting who are recovering at a Florida hospital.

He's praising the "incredible" work of doctors, nurses and first responders who helped victims after the shooting.

South Broward High School Students Fear They Could Be Next

Feb 16, 2018
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Students at South Broward High School in Hollywood organized a gun control protest outside school grounds Friday, two days after a gunman opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, killing 17 people.

From the morning bell at 8 a.m. till past the last bell of the day, students and a few faculty members held posters and chanted, “It could have been us” and “It can still be us.”

South Broward is about half an hour away from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where a 19-year-old opened fire on Wednesday, killing 17.

Emilee McGovern / WLRN

After this week’s shooting in Parkland, a local funeral home owner extended an offer —free funeral services for  the victims.

The shooting was a little too close to home.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The first funerals for students killed in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were held on Friday.

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