#Metoo

Sarah Jessica Parker has spent much of her acting career exploring what it means to be in a relationship — and to be single. In the HBO series Sex and the City, which ran from 1998 until 2004, she played Carrie Bradshaw, a single writer chronicling her experiences with the Manhattan dating scene. Now, in the HBO comedy series, Divorce, she stars as Frances, a mother of two navigating the dissolution of her marriage.

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden on Sunday responded to allegations that he acted inappropriately when he kissed the back of a former Nevada Democratic assemblywoman's head at a campaign event in 2014, saying his behavior has been affectionate but never unseemly.

In February, Pope Francis acknowledged a longstanding dirty secret in the Roman Catholic Church — the sexual abuse of nuns by priests.

It's an issue that had long been kept under wraps, but in the #MeToo era, a #NunsToo movement has emerged, and now sexual abuse is more widely discussed.

Is it an innocent display of jubilation over a war's end or an unacceptable act of sexual aggression?

The context of a kiss is clashing with an evolving emphasis on consent in the #MeToo era.

Updated at 7:05 p.m. ET

The woman who accused Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax of sexual assault has gone public with her story by releasing a statement describing the 2004 encounter when both were attending the Democratic National Convention in Boston.

Vanessa Tyson said she recently wrote in a private message on Facebook that she was assaulted by someone at the convention, but she did not name Fairfax. The conservative website Big League Politics published the message earlier this week, naming Fairfax as the alleged assailant.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

Harvey Weinstein, the disgraced former movie mogul, continues to face charges of rape and sexual assault in New York state, after his legal team failed in its bid to have the case thrown out.

At a brief hearing in New York on Thursday morning, a judge rejected arguments by Weinstein's attorneys that the five outstanding charges should be dismissed and the case dropped.

A hearing for the case is now scheduled for early March.

This #MeToo-era-cum-yuletide-season, radio stations are pulling the plug on that holiday earworm with lyrics that, to some, ring date-rape warning bells, rather than evoking innocent snow-bound flirtation.

Updated at 5:58 p.m. ET

USA Gymnastics, the sport's national governing body, said today that it had voluntarily filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Google employees worldwide are walking off the job to protest the company's treatment of women and its handling of sexual assault cases.

They walked out of Google offices at 11:10 a.m. local time Thursday in Singapore, Zurich, London, Dublin and New York City, filling nearby streets, sidewalks and parks.

And in California, home to Google's headquarters, employees streamed out of its offices into plazas.

One year after the #MeToo movement took off, new NPR-Ipsos polls show the nation deeply divided on sexual assault and harassment, with fissures running more along party lines than gender.

Most — 69 percent — of more than 1,000 Americans surveyed, say the movement has created a climate in which offenders will now be held accountable. But more than 40 percent feel the movement has gone too far.

In the basement of a suburban Philadelphia home, half a dozen high school freshman boys recently met to munch on chips and pretzels — and to talk about sexual assault in the wake of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.

A Jewish group called Moving Traditions brought them together as part of its programs to encourage teenagers to talk about this and other difficult issues. Temple Sinai in Dresher, Pa., sponsors this local group.

Updated at 9:49 p.m. ET

President Trump continued his defense Tuesday of his Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, mocking one of Kavanaugh's accusers at a Mississippi campaign rally.

The latest move by Trump came just hours after he had highlighted the possibility of false accusations against young men in the midst of a cultural moment brought on in the past year by the #MeToo movement.

Fallen media mogul Harvey Weinstein's recent indictment on rape charges comes nearly eight months after allegations against him first surfaced. His case touched off a global #MeToo movement to speak out against workplace sexual harassment. And that, in turn, has created a deluge of complaints to human resources departments everywhere.

"It created this HR level of activity like nothing we've ever seen," says Johnny Taylor, CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

After several months of bitter legal battles and political tussles, first-term Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens said Tuesday he is resigning as of Friday.

Greitens had been facing a felony charge and possible impeachment during an investigation of claims that he tried to dodge the state's campaign disclosure laws and to blackmail a former lover.

Updated at 9:58 a.m. ET

Harvey Weinstein surrendered Friday to authorities at a police station in New York City, where the former Hollywood megaproducer has been charged with rape and sexual misconduct.

Weinstein arrived early in the morning at the New York Police Department's 1st Precinct in Lower Manhattan, ushered into the station by law enforcement officers as members of the media crowded behind metal barriers. He kept his gaze lowered amid a barrage of shouted questions.

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