Miami Beach

Andy Sweet / Courtesy

Before the city of Miami Beach became a hotspot for nightlife and celebrities, it was home to a massive Jewish retiree population. It's estimated that 20,000 elderly Jews made up more than half of the beach's population in the late 1970s. This era in Miami's history and the experiences of the Jewish community is the focus of a new book of photography entitled "Shtetl in the Sun: Andy Sweet's South Beach Photography 1977-1980."

pbarcas/flickr

Florida’s Supreme Court effectively blocked on Tuesday a Miami Beach law that would have raised the minimum wage in the city, ending a years long battle to allow Florida cities to set their own minimum wages.

The city passed an ordinance under former Mayor Philip Levine in 2016 that would have raised the minimum wage in the city to $13.31 by January 1st, 2021.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Tucked among vape shops and tattoo parlors, a cat cafe has popped up on Washington Avenue between 14th Street and Española Way. Tourists soaking in the sun in a post-Christmas stupor peer through a window into a version of the paradise surrounding them.

  

For the 26 cat “residents,” it’s called Purradise. They roam freely in a space emulating South Beach – complete with palm tree scratch posts, lifeguard stands and bean bags resembling beach balls, which serve as ideal nap pods for tabbies, calicos and Persians.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The smell of steaming jelly doughnuts fried in oil carried through Lincoln Road on Sunday, the eighth and final night of Hanukkah festivities on Miami Beach.

Between improvised versions of ‘I Have A Little Dreidel’ and lighting the menorah, members of the Jewish community reflected on a challenging few months.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The Miami Beach Convention Center has completed its three-year, $620-million renovation in time for the start of the annual international Art Basel festival.

Miami Herald

Events like Art Basel and Spring Break bring tens of thousands of spectators, art aficionados and tourists to Miami, but creates logistical challenges for residents.

Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the "real solution" to improve the safety and traffic nightmare is a "robust" security plan and more cops on the ground.  

Oates joined Sundial to talk about his department's efforts.

This conversation has been edited lightly for clarity. 

STIAN ROENNING / MIAMI HERALD

A new play at the Colony Theater in Miami Beach tells the story of the night Cassius Clay won the heavyweight title and became Muhammad Ali.

The show, “One Night in Miami,” takes the audience back to February 25, 1964, and recounts the history of a celebratory night in an Overtown motel room with four best friends: Muhammad Ali, Sam Cooke, Jim Brown, and Malcolm X.

WLRN file photo

In a case being watched by business groups and local governments, the city of Miami Beach is asking the Florida Supreme Court to act quickly in a battle about the legality of a local minimum wage.

Justices last month, in a 4-3 decision, agreed to take up the city’s appeal of a ruling that blocked a minimum-wage ordinance from taking effect. The ordinance, approved in 2016, had been planned to set the minimum wage in the city at $10.31 an hour this year, with annual incremental increases to $13.31 an hour in January 2021.

Miami Herald

Beginning next year, Miami Beach’s hotel housekeepers will be armed.

Their weapon, panic buttons, will help combat sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, a problem that is being more widely discussed and addressed following the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Beginning Aug. 1, 2019, Miami Beach will be the third tourism town, after Seattle and Chicago, to mandate that hotels provide the devices. The Beach is calling them “safety buttons.”

Miami Beach Police Department

The former Marlborough House condominium building in Miami Beach collapsed Monday morning, injuring one, according to Miami Beach police.

The building no longer had residents. Permits had been pulled for the destruction of the 13-floor building built in 1963 and bought by Brazilian developer Jose Isaac Peres. Peres plans an 89-story tower on the beachfront property at 5775 Collins Ave.

Facebook

Several African American models who were at a casting call for Miami Swim Week said a California-based swimsuit line turned them away Thursday.

The reason? Their race, they said on a video posted to Facebook.

But the line, Huntington Beach-based KYA Swim, said it was “disturbed” by the allegations that the show was discriminating against African American models. The designer went on to open and close its Miami Swim Week show with a model of color.

WLRN

On July 13, Walter Edward Stolper, a Nazi sympathizer, was caught in the act of pouring gasoline around his Miami Beach condo unit with the intent of igniting it. He was originally charged with attempted arson, but that was elevated to attempted murder. Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the case is likely to be considered a hate crime.

"[Stolper's] got two very powerful prosecution teams, the state and the feds looking at him," Oates said Wednesday on Sundial. "And again we avoided a tragedy because someone heard something and alerted law enforcement." 

Hustle And Flow: How Philip Levine Made The Money That's Financing His Bid For Governor

Jul 11, 2018
Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/ Pool

Philip Levine has told the story so many times that it sounds like a fable.

With $500 in the bank, a young man opened a small office on South Beach, launched a cruise-line media company and created a tourism marketing empire that sold a decade later for a small fortune. The tale is the backbone of a campaign promoting a self-made, blue-collar businessman who as governor would change Tallahassee to make it work for its 21 million "customers."

Screenshot/MakeMusicDay.org

All of Miami will be dropping beats Thursday.

    

The city is marking the longest day of the year – officially the summer solstice – with a lineup of free musical performances. 

Make Music Miami is joining the worldwide celebration Make Music Day, which began in Paris in 1982 as Fête de la Musique. More than 800 cities in 120 countries carry on the spirit of the day – that all musicians can play in public spaces.

Sam Turken / WLRN News

Phillip Gonzalez didn't think he was going to make it in.

He arrived at Manolo's at around 8 a.m. on Saturday—an hour after many others—to watch Argentina's first World Cup match. At first, the Argentinian restaurant on Miami Beach told him it reached capacity and locked him and several others out as the game began. 

But then Manolo's made an exception and let them in. Others weren't so lucky. 

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