Miami-Dade County

Trump Rolls Back 'Completely One-Sided' Cuba Policy

Jun 16, 2017
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

President Donald Trump Friday announced new restrictions on travel and business with Cuba, reversing some of the relaxed new relations instituted two years ago by President Barack Obama.

Mosquito Control: Tips for the Rainy Season

Jun 1, 2017
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Drain and cover. That's the message Miami-Dade County mosquito control specialists want the public to hear. 

Mosquitos can lay more than 100 eggs at a time, and they do so in standing water. Even a bottle cap of water is big enough.

Mosquitos can carry the West Nile virus and the Zika virus, among other things. 

Miami-Dade County plans to hire a full-time entomologist in its increasingly costly fight against the Zika virus.

Matias Ocner

 


Miami-Dade County is rolling out new technology to improve transit.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Officials from four South Florida counties are collecting public input on an updated regional plan to address climate change and related challenges.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson continued his visit to Miami Thursday. Carson is on what he calls a cross-country “listening tour” learning about the projects HUD and other housing organizations fund.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Its economy relies to an absurd extent on the low-wage tourism sector. Because it lacks higher-wage, tech-oriented jobs, its average citizens struggle to bridge the chasm between their incomes and their exorbitant living costs.

But so what? It’s a sunny town on a bay with muy caliente Latin flavor. The visitors and their money will keep coming and keep the place afloat. Besides, it’s got more important things to worry about – like a mortal political enemy 90 miles away.

Florida lawmakers are pressing pause on a bill that would pave the way for an elected sheriff in Miami-Dade County. The plan is forcing legislators to choose between empowering voters or stepping on the toes of local governments. 

Miami-Dade Outlines Aggressive Mosquito Control Plan

Apr 4, 2017

Officials say no disease-carrying mosquitoes have been found so far this year in the Miami area.

Kate Stein / WLRN

 

What if 30 percent of Miami-Dade County were shaded by trees? What would that look like? Is that something we’d really want?

Yes! says County Commissioner Dennis Moss. He heads the county’s Million Trees initiative.

 

"The trees are there, and they basically provide shade and they cool the community," Moss said. "When you have trees in the area, children are more inclined to go out and play."

 

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

In an effort to bring Airbnb under some of the same regulations its competitors in the hotel industry face, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez has reached an agreement with the popular home-sharing platform to collect county resort taxes.

Under the agreement, Airbnb will collect the 6 percent Miami-Dade resort tax from its hosts and remit that money to the county every month. If trends continue, that would amount to at least $8 million a year for the county, said Benjamin Breit, an Airbnb spokesman.

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This week on The Florida Roundup...

Miami-Dade County Commission Rejects 'Sanctuary' County Stance

Feb 17, 2017
C.M. Guerrero / MIAMI HERALD

Miami-Dade commissioners on Friday backed Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s controversial decision to detain jailed inmates sought for deportation by the federal government, citing funding threats by President Donald Trump and ignoring hours of emotional testimony from residents who implored the board to stand up to the mayor.

With a 9-3 vote, commissioners stood behind Gimenez despite listening to scores of residents who spent the day at County Hall hoping to persuade them to protect Miami-Dade’s immigrant identity.

Miami Herald

Fearing a loss of millions of dollars for defying immigration authorities, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez on Thursday ordered county jails to comply with federal immigration detention requests — effectively gutting the county’s position as a “sanctuary” for immigrants in the country illegally.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

If you commute to work, you probably pick your route based on what's fastest. You might try to take roads with the least traffic or the highest travel speed. But that can be hard when traffic is bad and speeds are slow. Should you stick with your original route or look for alternatives?

 

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