Miami flooding

Miami Herald archives

Florida is sending $25 million to South Florida to buy out homeowners ready to surrender to hurricanes and rising seas.

On Tuesday, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity awarded $44 million in Hurricane Irma relief money to cities and counties around the state to purchase vulnerable property in an attempt to cut the cost of future damage. In South Florida, Monroe County will receive the lion’s share - $15 million - with another $5 million going to Marathon, about $4.5 million to Miami-Dade County and just over $200,000 to the Village of Islamorada.

Miami Herald archives

In his new book, "The Geography of Risk: Epic Storms, Rising Seas, and the Cost of America's Coast," Pulitzer-prize winning author Gilbert Gaul takes a look at the U.S. history of coastal development since World War II - and finds a recipe for disaster.

Vaguely Artistic / Flickr/Creative Commons

Early voting is underway in Miami, Miami Beach, Hialeah and Homestead.

Voters in Miami and Miami Beach are deciding the fate of borrowing and booze. Miami wants to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars for the environment and other items. Miami Beach will decide if there should be an earlier last call for alcohol on a stretch of Ocean Drive for outdoor bars.

Courtesy of @robertsonadams

More than five inches of rain combined with rising tide left parts of South Florida under water this Tuesday evening, as the region dealt with the last remains of tropical depression Emily. 

Nickolay Lamm / StorageFront.com

Current climate change and sea level rise models indicate a very grim -- and water-logged -- future for South Florida and Miami in particular. But new imagery from researcher/artist Nickolay Lamm paints an almost hypnotic picture of these proposed realties for American cities like Miami, Boston, Washington D.C., and New York.

maxstrz / Flickr Creative Commons

If sea level rise continues unabated, sections of South Florida -- and Miami in particular -- will be under water in a matter of decades. But a new study suggests that swift reductions in "short-lived climate pollutants" and carbon dioxide levels could help to slow the rise.