Miami International Airport

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN News

Coming fresh off of the rush after a reelection campaign kickoff rally in Orlando on Tuesday, President Trump flew to Miami and appeared briefly before an eager crowd of supporters on the tarmac at Miami International airport about a half hour before midnight.

 

President Trump arrived in the Air Force One and stepped out to greet a crowd of about a hundred at around 11:25 p.m. He made no statements to the press.

 

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

After a long evening of rehashing the 2016 election, claiming accomplishments and announcing his 2020 run to supporters at the Amway Center in Orlando, President Donald Trump landed in Miami late Tuesday night.

The president arrived at Miami International Airport aboard by Air Force One at 11:25 p.m.

He waved to the large crowd of friends and family, who arrived by the truckload an hour before the landing.

Read more from our news partner the Miami Herald.

Miami International Airport

Hundreds of union workers who prepare food for flights out of Miami International Airport are voting whether to strike for higher wages.

The workers employed by LSG Sky Chefs have been submitting ballots Thursday and Friday, and the union representing them—Unite Here Local 355—expects the vote to pass.

The employees include cooks who prepare food at kitchens near the airport to drivers who load the food on to American Airlines, Delta and United flights. The union says the workers make an average of $12.95 per hour. They want to see wages rise to at least $15 per hour.

Sherrilyn Cabrera / WLRN

The fight for better treatment and improved working conditions for employees continued Monday at Miami International Airport. Several employees of Eulen America joined Miami-Dade County Commissioner Eileen Higgins in a protest to demand workplace injury reports be released and that retaliatory efforts by the company stop.

Miami International Airport

Long shifts outside without water breaks, broken and dangerous equipment, wage theft and an entrenched climate of fear. Contracted baggage haulers, airplane cleaners and other employees say working conditions at Miami International Airport are inhumane and abusive.

Getty images via Miami Herald

President Donald Trump has ordered all Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 jets in the U.S. grounded following the Sunday crash in which 157 were killed.

The order is effective immediately. Any Max jets now in the air will be grounded after landing, according to reports by CNN.

All 24 of American Airline’s Max 8 jets run operations out of Miami International Airport. The airline did not immediately respond to comment saying how its flights would be affected. Previously the airline issued a statement that saying it maintained full confidence in its Max fleet.

TED S. WARREN, FILE AP PHOTO

Florida Republican Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart is among the latest to support grounding Boeing 737-800 MAX planes until crash investigators determine the cause of a deadly crash Sunday in Ethiopia.

The Boeing 737-800 MAX planes are Boeing's newest commercial passenger jets. They have been involved in two deadly overseas crashes in less than five months.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Linda Jones is running out of options.

A Transportation Security Administration employee working without pay during the government shutdown, Jones has burned through her savings, cut her food consumption and reduced how much she drives. Now, she questions whether she can keep her home.

“If this goes on, how do I pay my mortgage? How do I pay for the repairs? How do I pay the utilities? Am I just going to be in a house that doesn’t have lights or electricity?” said Jones, who works at Miami International Airport.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Carrying coladas, purse-sized puppies and mountains of luggage, passengers at the terminal of Miami International Airport rushed on Wednesday to board departing flights, going about their usual routines. Many ignored the members of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, also known as NATCA, standing in the middle of the chaos, passing out flyers.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Daniel Garcia-Barbon’s wish when he was a teenager was to become an air traffic controller. The fast-paced, mistake-free environment of the work seemed thrilling.

Now, 10 years since fulfilling his dream, Garcia-Barbon’s job is failing to support him, his wife and two children. The air traffic controller in Miami, who’s working without pay due to the partial government shutdown, says he will now use his savings to pay a mortgage. Spending on other luxuries is no longer an option.

SAM TURKEN / WLRN

In a unanimous vote at the Miami-Dade County Commission meeting on Tuesday, concession workers at Miami International Airport were included in the county’s living wage ordinance. While $4.98  may not seem like a lot, it’s a chunk of change Miami International Airport concession workers have been fighting to earn for years.

Wendi Walsh, the secretary and treasurer of Unite Here Local 355, is a member of the union that’s been leading the fight. “They’re not gonna get rich, but they’re gonna be able to put food on the table for their kids, so we’re thrilled,” says Walsh.

Sam Turken / WLRN

The Miami-Dade County Commission approved on Tuesday a proposal that would extend the county's living wage ordinance to concession workers at Miami International Airport.

Under the new proposal, the workers will join other employees at the airport—like janitors—who already make the county's living wage. 

A man with a python hidden inside an external hard drive was stopped from boarding a Florida plane headed to Barbados.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Concession and flight catering workers at Miami International Airport protested Tuesday for higher wages. 

Dressed in red t-shirts that read "Fed Up," employees of LSG Sky Chefs said the in-flight food catering company has been underpaying them. They want American Airlines, the largest airline at the airport, to pressure Sky Chefs to raise its employees' wages. 

Tom Hudson

It seems appropriate that the first item on the list of Chinese goods facing the threat of a U.S. tariff in the gathering storm over trade -- Thorium -- is named for the Norse God of Thunder.

 

The last item on America’s $50 billion, 1,300-item list is parts of seats made of bamboo. The U.S. imported about $1 million worth of it from China last year.

 

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