miami transportation

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

South Floridians complain a lot about traffic. Jammed expressways, reckless drivers and unreliable public transportation contribute to a perennial dissatisfaction about the state of the region’s roadways – which sometimes not even the best Waze-like app can mitigate.

 

“Traveling from South Dade to North Broward is a pain on I-95. The lanes are so narrow, it feels downright dangerous,” says Jeziel Garcia, who lives in Parkland.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

Over the last decade, the city of Miami has removed the vast majority of individual street parking meters and half of its multispace meters, according to the Miami Parking Authority. This has led to vast sections of the city that have no available methods of paying for parking other than using PayByPhone, a privately owned company that is owned by Volkswagen, the largest car manufacturer in the world.

Sam Turken / WLRN

South Miami-Dade residents will have to wait a little longer for the county to decide how it will improve the South Dade Transitway Corridor.  

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

Parking in Miami was once a simple task: bring some change, maybe a few dollars to hand to the parking attendant, park your car, leave and return. But those days are long gone.

And just like that, they were gone.

Mere weeks after blanketing the City of Miami with electronic scooters, two major scooter providers are temporarily pulling out after the city attorneys issued cease and desist letters stating they were in violation of Florida statutes.

“Until there is clear direction from the Commission on how to move forward, we must enforce existing laws,” said City of Miami spokesman Eugene Ramirez in an email. A discussion regarding electric scooters is on the agenda for the June 28th Commission meeting, he said.

Eileen Higgins Twitter

The Miami-Dade County Commission District 5 seat has not been open for 20 years.

Former Commissioner Bruno Barreiro resigned earlier this year to run for Congress, causing the need for a special election. 

Transit-Alliance

Bus riders in Miami-Dade County are waiting longer for their buses to arrive than in years past. Depending on the route, waiting times range from 15-45 minutes. In some instances, buses aren't arriving at all. 

CHARLES TRAINOR JR.

Good things come to those who wait.

That was the message Brightline sent to Miami commuters on Friday as it announced that its fast-travel rail service was finally coming to downtown — and not just “soon” or “in the coming weeks” as the company has been known to promise over the past year.

Tom Hudson

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez thinks that transportation woes in the region have gotten worse, but he thinks drivers have become more courteous.

Those two statements came at the beginning and at the end of an interview with the mayor focused on transportation in the region.

This is how we started our interview:

WLRN: Would you agree that transportation is in crisis in Miami-Dade County?

Gimenez: No. Does it need improvement? Yes, it does. Has it gotten worse? Yes, it has. 

And this is how it ended:

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Brightline train tests began Wednesday morning for the Miami-to-Fort Lauderdale route, at the same time as Miami-Dade County and Brightline officials were meeting in downtown Miami to discuss rail safety measures.

Courtesy Greater Miami Tramlink Partners

Miami Beach commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday to temporarily stop the fast-tracked light rail project that would lay down tracks on South Beach’s streets.

The light rail or “modern streetcar” line, a centerpiece issue in Mayor Philip Levine’s second term, is now on hold after commissioners agreed to wait for Miami-Dade County commissioners to make a binding commitment to building a connection across Biscayne Bay, including a funding plan. A final contract for the project would also have to be approved by voters.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

Miami-Dade County taxi drivers protested Tuesday outside Government Center Station in Downtown Miami, for equal rights as they compete with new ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft. 



Since companies like Uber and Lyft started legal operations in Miami-Dade County last May, cabbies have struggled to keep up with what they call cheaper and more unregulated competition.



“Since Uber came to Miami-Dade County we lost everything,” Jean Jules, a single father of two and taxicab driver in Miami, said.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Do you remember the newer version of The Italian Job with Mark Wahlberg?  

A team of glorified thieves is trying to steal back a couple million in gold bricks. Their escape in a fleet of mini coopers hinges on their computer wiz’s ability to hack into the city’s traffic control center and make sure their route is free, and their pursuers get stuck in traffic.

Well that traffic puppeteer possibility is now a reality in Miami-Dade County, which for the first time has a centralized system to view intersections and change lights with the few clicks on the computer.

Chabeli Herrera

How South Florida gets around, or doesn't, is increasingly a matter of public debate. Climbing commuting times, more tolls and long-promised but never delivered public transportation projects like BayLink are pushing our collective patience. It costs commuters money and costs the economy lost productivity.

As the region has grown across political boundaries, transportation planning has not kept pace.

Friends of the Underline

Gov. Rick Scott's nearly half-billion dollars in budget vetoes this week included $2 million for the Underline, a park and bike and walking path planned for the space under the Metrorail tracks from Dadeland to Brickell.

That’s not deterring advocates of the park, though.

Nearly 200 people turned out last night to weigh in on preliminary designs for the park at a community meeting in Coconut Grove.

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