Miami

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

There is another political crisis raging in Latin America besides Venezuela. That’s Nicaragua, where the authoritarian regime has all but criminalized independent journalism. But one Nicaraguan journalist exiled in Miami has won a measure of revenge.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Calle Ocho made way for three clomping camels on Sunday afternoon to celebrate Miami’s annual Three Kings Day Parade, also known as La Parada de los Reyes Magos

Sam Turken / WLRN

As Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro was sworn in to a second term on Thursday in Caracas, nearly a hundred Venezuelan-Americans and exiles protested in Miami against his recent reelection, calling it a sham.

The demonstrators held signs and yelled outside Venezuela’s consulate in Downtown, saying the election was just the latest corrupt action by Maduro's dictatorship. Already, more than a dozen countries across the world have refused to recognize his presidency.

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

Travelers visiting Miami this holiday season will be paying more for parking come New Year’s Day.

City commissioners recently decided on increasing parking rates for non-residents, who’ll be charged $3 or more per hour to park. If you live in the city and register through the PayByPhone app, you’ll pay $1.40 per hour.

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The U.S. just slapped heavier economic sanctions on the Nicaraguan government for its violent repression of protesters. Among the Nicaraguans denouncing that regime here in South Florida is the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Luis Enrique. Known as the “Prince of Salsa,”  Luis Enrique today lives in Miami – where his new protest anthem “Mordaza” is a popular hit.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

There is no end in sight to Venezuela’s humanitarian or political emergencies. One of the top Latin American diplomats trying to solve the crises is in Miami this week - and he sees no easy solutions on the horizon.

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

Viernes Culturales will move to the third Friday of the month, organizers of the 18-year cultural gathering announced on Monday.

Eraldo Peres / AP via Miami Herald

This month Brazilian President-elect Jair Bolsonaro took a hard line against communist Cuba. The right-wing congressman said when he becomes President in January, he’ll take aim at a program that pays thousands of Cuban doctors to work in Brazil.

Miami Herald

They’re called enchufados — Venezuelans “plugged in” to the country’s corrupt socialist regime who bring allegedly dirty wealth here to Florida. The U.S. has just indicted one of the wealthiest alleged enchufados — who may now lose his Coral Gables mansion among numerous other assets.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Earlier this month, thousands of Brazilian expats converged on downtown Miami to vote in the first round of Brazil’s presidential election.

It wasn’t hard to figure out who their favorite candidate was. Most erupted in cheers when a truck passed the polling station with an electronic billboard flashing the picture of right-wing Congressman Jair Bolsonaro.

Jennine Capó Crucet / Courtesy

Cuban-American author Jennine Capó Crucet has taken her “very Miami” teaching style and pineapple tights to Nebraska.

Her book, “Make Your Home Among Strangers,” is the first title of the Sundial Book Club. It follows a young Cuban-American woman, Lizet Ramirez, as she goes from her life in Hialeah to an elite private school in the Northeast. Ramirez is then pulled between life at college and home, finding herself in the middle of a national immigration debate in Miami. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

People experiencing homelessness in Miami now have access to a new bathroom after the city  opened on Wednesday its first permanent toilet in Downtown. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

Miami ranks 29th on a list of cities for how well it integrates immigrants, according to a new annual assessment by the bipartisan group New American Economy. 

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COMMENTARY

As a registered independent, I neither supported nor opposed Maria Elvira Salazar’s Republican primary run for Congress from Florida’s 27th District, where I reside.

But there’s one thing about Salazar’s landslide victory on Tuesday that I’m unabashedly enthusiastic about. It may have finally driven a stake through the heart of one of South Florida’s most poisonous political practices: accusing your opponent of being soft on communist Cuba.

Venezuelan Government

Critics joke that Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro blames the U.S. – especially his Venezuelan foes living in the U.S. – whenever he stubs his toe. And most of the world ignores his leftist scapegoating.

But this month the world is wondering, cautiously, if Maduro might have a case, at least when it comes to some Venezuelans residing here.

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