Muslims

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The anti-Muslim organization ACT for America, whose founder once wrote that terrorists attacks represent the “purest form of what the Prophet Mohammed created,” will have to find another venue for its planned Nov. 7 gala — President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club is yanking the welcome mat.

“This event will absolutely not be taking place at Mar-a-Lago,” Amanda Miller, a spokeswoman for the Trump Organization, said in an emailed statement Sunday.

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COMMENTARY

We’re locked in yet another Trump-era moment that forces us to ponder the Ugly American.

Right now it’s President Trump’s alleged efforts to bully countries like Ukraine into dishing dirt on his political rivals. Last year it was his Oval Office whining about immigrants from what he called “sh—hole” countries.

But this week an obituary reminded me there was a time when Americans recognized, even celebrated the dignity of people from those countries.

In a media landscape that can still be pretty awful for Muslims, Tell Them, I Am, a new podcast from KPCC, aims to give Muslims a space to define their own identities outside of stereotypes and broad generalizations.

In recent days, Rupert Murdoch's Fox News Channel and some of its corporate siblings have faced renewed and withering criticism for the way they depict Muslims and immigrants. Calls for boycotts of shows and pressure campaigns on advertisers ensued.

Last weekend, a Muslim news producer said she quit Fox's corporate cousin, Sky News Australia, over its coverage of Muslims following the massacre at two New Zealand mosques. Her post went viral.

Miami Herald

Last March, Florida International University President Mark Rosenberg spoke onstage at a gathering for the Coalition of South Florida Muslim Organizations. He said that in a time of divisions, FIU must do more to promote discourse and relationship-building between people of different religions and cultures.

“If you give me a pile of stones, my responsibility and the responsibility of my colleagues at FIU with those stones is to build a bridge,” he said. “Now more than ever, we need those bridges.”

President Trump as a candidate once called for a ban on Muslim immigrants and declared that "Islam hates us." Now, he has alarmed American Muslims again with his choice of a new national security adviser and a new secretary of state, even as he has strengthened ties with Muslim allies in the Middle East.

The connection between Middle Eastern and Mexican food goes all the way back to the Moors, and is well-known in culinary circles. Al pastor tacos are just a pork version of the shawarma spits that Lebanese immigrants brought with them to Mexico City in the 1930s. In nearby Puebla, a wrap called tacos árabes — Arabic tacos — uses a flatbread that's halfway between pita and lavash. Kibbe (fried meatballs made from bulghur wheat) is popular in the Yucatán, thanks to Syrians who settled in the Peninsula over the past century.

Updated at 9:20 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday morning shared with his millions of Twitter followers incendiary videos from a far-right British anti-Muslim party, drawing criticism from Britain's prime minister and Islamic groups.

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Shirin Jaafari/PRI

Growing up, Amanda Saab loved watching cooking shows on TV. "Iron Chef" was a favorite. So was "Emeril Live."

In those days, Saab says, recipes on the internet weren't as readily available. So, she would sit in front of the TV, pen and a notebook in hand.

Muslim children are more likely to be bullied in school than children of other faiths. A new survey by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) reveals that 42 percent of Muslims with children in K–12 schools report bullying of their children because of their faith, compared with 23 percent of Jewish and 20 percent of Protestant parents.

These results confirm recent findings by other research and advocacy groups showing that bullying of students of color is on the rise.

When is a guest list more than a guest list? When politicians bring a plus-one to a presidential address before a joint session of Congress.

Each member of Congress can invite a guest to tonight's speech, and many members will use the occasion to send a pointed political message to President Trump and the public about the issues that matter to them.

Katie Lepri / WLRN.org

Khizr Khan is the immigrant Gold Star father who denounced presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Democratic National Convention. Before receiving an award Friday night in Miami, he spoke with WLRN about immigration controversies national – and local.

Pakistani-Americans Khan and his wife lost their U.S. Army officer son Humayun Khan in Iraq when he confronted a suicide bomber. Last year they became the face of opposition to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign rhetoric against immigrants and Muslims like themselves.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Americans gathered at a number of U.S. airports over the weekend – including Miami International Airport, Fort Lauderdale International Airport and Palm Beach International Airport – to protest President Donald J. Trump’s order to keep many foreigners out of the country.

Updated 2 p.m. ET

President Trump's freeze on immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries cites the potential threat of terrorism. But here's the twist — it doesn't include any countries from which radicalized Muslims have actually killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001.

The president's executive action, which he signed Friday at the Pentagon, applies to these countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan.

Mansoor Shams is comfortable with a variety of labels.

He's a veteran, who served in the U.S. Marines from 2000 to 2004. He's a small-business owner. He's a Muslim youth leader. And now he's an ambassador — self-appointed.

Shams is traveling around the country with a sign that says, "I'm A Muslim U.S. Marine Ask Anything."

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