NASA

The exploration of our outer solar system is about to hit a real slump.

NASA is celebrating Juno's arrival at Jupiter, but in less than two years, Juno will be gone — it's slated to plunge into the gas giant and burn up. The Cassini spacecraft, now orbiting Saturn, will meet the same fate next year.

NASA called off today's effort to inflate an expandable module attached to the International Space Station after its first attempt fell flat.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Wikimedia Commons

Celestially minded Miamians (and anyone else interested) will be able to view the International Space Station (ISS) with the naked eye Thursday morning, according to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

NASA’s “Spot the Station” widget identifies specific dates and times that the ISS will be visible without a telescope.

These windows, however, are narrow — the next opportunity for viewing the ISS will occur Thursday at 5:47 a.m., and it will only be visible for two minutes.

International Space Station (via Instagram at http://instagram.com/iss)

At some point during his studies at Florida Atlantic University, astronaut Steve Swanson started thinking about his future. Perhaps it could involve space travel.

Eventually, Swanson did become an engineer for NASA. He took two shuttle missions to the International Space Station between 2007 and 2009. His last trip began in March of this year, when he took a Russian rocket back to the ISS for a six-month tour.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Courtesy Lockheed Martin

Lauren Case already knows what she’s going to say on the first day of school when her students ask what she did over summer break:

“I saw a rocket launch; it was awesome. You want to go too? Maybe you should become an engineer,” says Case, a 10th grade science teacher at South Fork High School in Stuart, Fla.

NASA

A recently unveiled project between NASA, the U.S. Geological Survey, TIME, Internet search giant Google and the CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University offers a rare glimpse of human life on Earth.

Over the last few decades, NASA and the USGS have been compiling satellite images of every part of our planet as part of the Landsat program, the world's longest running enterprise for gathering satellite imagery.

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