Nicolas Maduro

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

President Trump came to Southcom in Doral today to tout his administration’s new anti-narcotics push in the Caribbean. But the visit was as much about Venezuela as it was about drugs.

Evan Vucci / AP

Over the weekend, President Trump was quoted saying he was interested in meeting with Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. And that has set off alarm bells – both to denounce and defend Trump – inside South Florida’s large Venezuelan diaspora.

Government of Cape Verde

Ten days ago, Colombian businessman Alex Saab was arrested in Cape Verde, an island republic off Africa’s west coast, as his private jet was refueling. Saab is wanted in the U.S. on money-laundering charges involving hundreds of millions of dollars – but his detention in Cape Verde and his possible extradition to Miami carry big political stakes in Venezuela.

Trump Says He'd Be Open To Meeting With Venezuela's Maduro

Jun 22, 2020
Associated Press

President Donald Trump declined in a recent interview to rule out meeting with Venezuelan leader Nicolas Maduro, expressing openness to a presidential visit that would upend his administration’s hard-line policy toward the dictator.

Susan Walsh / AP

WASHINGTON — A new book by President Donald Trump’s former National Security Advisor says the president waffled on his decision to recognize Juan Guaidó as Venezuela’s legitimate leader over Nicolás Maduro within hours after the initial announcement went public in January 2019.

In one of the most controversial moments of one of America’s most controversial presidencies, Donald Trump this month sent National Guard troops to Washington's D.C.'s Lafayette Square, near the White House. Pepper spray was fired to disperse what videos show were largely peaceful protesters demonstrating against police brutality and racism.

Trump says he supports the protesters’ cause. But his unusual military response has divided Americans – including Latin American expats here in South Florida.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

For a year-and-a-half now, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó have been at political — if not actual — war. But now they’ve actually shaken hands on something.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

COMMENTARY

It’s hard to say whose anti-media rants this week are more absurd: President Trump’s, over Twitter’s decision to add fact-check notices to his factless tweets. Or socialist Venezuela’s, over DirecTV’s understandable decision to pull out of the country.

But regardless of whose authoritarian whining is more egregious, Trump’s behavior could have a more troubling effect on his administration’s campaign to restore democracy in Venezuela – or in any country like Venezuela.

In a purported interrogation video released Wednesday by the Venezuelan government, one of the two former U.S. service members detained earlier this week in Venezuela acknowledged plans to help carry out a coup. Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro revealed the video at a televised address in the capital, Caracas.

COMMENTARY

The mercenaries who “invaded” Venezuela last weekend to capture President Nicolás Maduro and topple his disastrous, dictatorial regime called their mission Operation Gideon.

More like Operation Idiot.

Matias Delacroix / AP

Venezuela says it’s captured two Americans allegedly leading mercenary soldiers against the country’s authoritarian government. They aren’t much of a threat militarily but image-wise they could be, both for the regime and for Venezuela’s opposition.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

COMMENTARY

You could say I’ve got pandemic in my blood. My first American ancestor came to this country in 1665 escaping London’s bubonic plague, which killed a quarter of the city's population.

Matias Delacroix / AP

The U.S. on March 26 indicted authoritarian Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro on narco-terrorism charges. Just days later the Trump Administration has laid out a "transition plan" for finally getting rid of Maduro.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

Thursday morning the Trump Administration charged the President of Venezuela and top regime officials with corruption and narco-terrorism against the U.S. And a large part of the federal indictments were focused on South Florida.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

Since COVID-19 is a global pandemic, more Americans are asking a relevant question: In life-and-death emergencies like this, should the U.S. loosen economic sanctions against countries like Cuba, Iran – and especially Venezuela?

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