photography

Carl Juste/ HavanaHaiti / Iris PhotoCollective

Miami Herald photographer Carl Juste has been capturing life in Cuba for 30 years, on assignment and on his own time. He, along with a group of award-winning photographers from Miami and Washington, D.C., traveled to Cuba in March 2019 on a five-day journey and took moving images of prominent Havana  neighborhoods. 

Alexandra Vivas / The Compassion Project

Powerful photographs revealing the lives of 25 women post-incarceration are on display at the Coral Gables Museum until Sept. 23. The exhibition, "The Compassion Project," focuses on women who re-entered society after some time behind bars and portrays these women in a new light.

As Key West's housing market caters more and more to the second home set, there's a new effort to preserve some of the island's multicultural history.

Mark Hedden

Key West photographer Mark Hedden has long been fascinated by the folks living on boats near Key West's shores, nicknamed the "liveaboards." In 2017 Mark was awarded a Knight Arts Challenge Grant to document the lives of this community.

Terence Price II / Courtesy

Photographer Terence Price II grew up at his grandparents' house in Miami Gardens. He was given his first film camera as a teen, and has been capturing the lives of people in his neighborhood ever since.

Price's photographs are black and white portraits and are meant to be capsules of time. He says his grandfather was an essential influence to his photography style: from how he decides to capture a photo to who he shoots.

The images of official White House photographers have always been shared widely. What made Pete Souza's tenure with the Obama White House different was that social media — and especially Instagram, founded in 2010 — gave him a popular new platform that previous photographers in the role didn't have.

Jaye Abbate is the CEO of ArtServe, a non-profit arts incubator that supports artists and cultural organizations in Broward County. Beth Clark is the CEO of Young Singers of the Palm Beaches.

Symone Titania Major

"The Unvoiced Community: Barbecue Men and Women of Goulds" is a photo exhibit that explores barbecue culture in the streets of South Miami-Dade County. The exhibit celebrates local entrepreneurs who set up in parking lots and street corners selling smoked meats late into the evening hours.

Alexandra Vivas / BoldBeautyProject.com

Shelly Baer was working with an organization that supports people with disabilities when somebody suggested making a fundraising calendar: nudes of women with disabilities.

In the 1970s, William Eggleston shocked the New York art world when the Museum of Modern Art exhibited his color photographs (Until then, most
serious photography had been black and white). Eggleston's pictures of the everyday established color photography and turned him into an art star. At the age of 78, the Memphis native surprised people yet again by releasing his first body of original music last October, an album titled Musik.

Photography documents life — and food, whether in the fore or background, seems to always be in the picture. The two intersect in a new book, Feast for the Eyes, written by photography curator Susan Bright and published by Aperture.

I’m looking at a photograph of a shoreline on the wall at the opening reception of "Potente" through my smartphone.

Four little white dots converge in the center and all of a sudden the water begins to crash on the rocks.

How did this happen? For answers I spoke with Felipe Aguilar, creator of "Potente," the installation currently being shown at the Colombian consulate in Coral Gables.

Aguilar, a native of Bogota, Colombia, is a graduate of the University of Miami with a degree in filmmaking.

Johanne Rahaman / blackflorida.org


Kali Duffy, YoungArts photography finalist

A group of young photographers from around the country huddled outside the Little Haiti Cultural Center this week listening to Carl Juste, a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist for the Miami Herald.

Juste, whose father Viter Juste is credited for coining the name Little Haiti, was schooling the photographers about the neighborhood’s vibe.

“People live on their porches, people greet. People exchange ideas and conversation outside their homes,” he said.

Andrew Kaufman

When the Panama Canal expansion was completed over the summer, tens of thousands of Panamanians celebrated the accomplishment at a ceremony.

The expansion represented economic opportunities for Panama -- in the form of tolls collected from increased shipping. It also created an opportunity for national pride. It’s also the reason that Port Miami has been expanded, in order for the post-Panamax ships to be able to dock here.

Photographer Andrew Kaufman has been documenting the entire process.

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