police

Nadege Green / WLRN News

Hours after a cell phone video captured the moment when a City of Miami police officer kicked a handcuffed man in the head, his sisters walked into a community meeting seeking answers.

The U.S. Supreme Court has again stepped into the bitter public turmoil over police shootings of civilians, ruling Monday that an Arizona police officer is shielded from being sued for shooting a woman in her own front yard.

The court said the officer acted reasonably, given that the woman, Amy Hughes, was carrying a large kitchen knife, that she was standing within striking distance of a woman who the officer did not know was Hughes' roommate, and that Hughes failed to drop the knife when ordered to do so.

She was there to remember the death of an unarmed black man at the hands of Sacramento police officers. But during the vigil for Stephon Clark, she was struck by a Sacramento County Sheriff Department vehicle.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Louisiana has declined to press charges against the pair of white police officers involved in the 2016 shooting death of Alton Sterling. The state's attorney general, Jeff Landry, announced the decision at a news conference Tuesday, saying that a months-long review of the incident failed to uncover evidence that either police officer could be held criminally responsible for Sterling's death.

An unarmed black man was shot and killed by a Broward County deputy in Lauderdale Lakes during a disturbance call at an apartment complex.

Updated at 12:52 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is lifting limits on the transfer of some surplus military hardware, including grenade launchers, bayonets and large-caliber weapons, to police departments.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the announcement in a speech on Monday to the Fraternal Order of Police conference in Nashville, Tenn. He said President Trump will issue an executive order that would restore in full a program that provides the military gear to local law enforcement.

New York City is set to begin giving body cameras to its police officers on Thursday.

Under the police department's pilot program, 1,200 officers in 20 precincts will receive the cameras. The officers will also be studied by scientists to see what effect the cameras have on policing.

As police don body cameras across the country, scientists are increasingly working with departments to figure out how the cameras change behavior — of officers and the public.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Police and government officials from Guatemala have been in Miami all week visiting schools and shadowing Miami-Dade schools police as part of a training program organized by the U.S. State department.

On Friday, they stood by and observed as MDCPS schools police cued mock explosions, students in gory makeup and a canine unit as part of hostage scenario training drill unfolding at Treasure Island Elementary School in North Bay Village.

In 1969, Philip Zimbardo, a psychologist from Stanford University, ran an interesting field study. He abandoned two cars in two very different places: one in a mostly poor, crime-ridden section of New York City, and the other in a fairly affluent neighborhood of Palo Alto, Calif. Both cars were left without license plates and parked with their hoods up.

The Pasco Sheriff’s Office issued an alert Friday afternoon of threatening “clown” sightings in the area.

Reports have come in from all over the country of people dressed up as clowns allegedly threatening and even attacking residents.

Gov. Rick Scott Signs Death-Benefits Bill For First Responders

Apr 8, 2016
City of Coral Gables Facebook

Gov. Rick Scott signed a measure Friday that will help families of first responders who are enrolled in the Florida Retirement System and get killed in the line of duty.

The death-benefits bill (SB 7012), a priority of Senate President Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, was among 17 bills Scott signed into law.

"When people give their lives in the service of our state, the least we can do is make sure we help provide for the families they leave behind," Gardiner said in a prepared statement.

The law covers first responders killed since July 1, 2013.

C.M. GUERRERO / El Nuevo Herald

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch was recently in Miami as part of her nationwide community policing tour.

During her visit to highlight initiatives that are strengthening community and police relationships, Lynch hosted a youth town hall at Overtown’s Booker T. Washington Senior High School.

“Let me tell you why I’m here in Miami. I came because of you,” she told the packed auditorium full of students and police officers.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Attorney General Loretta Lynch is in Miami as part of a nationwide community policing tour.

Part of her visit is to highlight what’s working here with community and police relationships.

 

At a youth town hall at Booker T, Washington High, she spoke with student Peace Ambassadors -- a program at Miami-Dade Public schools in partnership with the U.S. State Attorney's Office in which students address violence and other social issues.  

 

Nadege Green

Miami’s Police Chief is encouraging officers to engage with the communities they patrol beyond arrests and traditional law enforcement actions.

Daniel Mocombe is a neighborhood resources officer in Liberty City doing just that. When he's not answering emergency calls, he's building relationships in the community.

His approach to the job comes from his own negative experience with a police officer when he was a teen.  This is what the job boils down to for him: "People just want to be treated like human beings."

SWOP

They will sing songs, recite poetry and read the names of sex workers who have been killed this year.

All across the country, different events will take place on Thursday (Dec. 17), to commemorate International Day to End Violence against Sex Workers.

In Fort Lauderdale, the newly formed chapter of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP-USA) is hosting a one-mile awareness march.

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