politics

Republican Governors Association
Courtesy of the Republican Governors Association / WLRN

Twenty three out of the 27 Republican Governors around the U.S. are in South Florida this week. Thursday was the second - and final day - of the annual Republican Governors Association Conference at a resort in Boca Raton. 

The association's goal is to help get Republican politicians get elected as governors across the country, as well as  provide them with some resources. 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

More than 20 Republican governors from across the U.S. are in Boca Raton discussing electoral strategy and other issues at an annual party gathering.

The two-day Republican Governors Association conference Wednesday and Thursday at the Boca Raton Resort and Club allows the governors to share policy initiatives in their respective states. It comes after the party suffered defeats in the Kentucky and Louisiana governor’s races and a win in a Mississippi gubernatorial contest earlier in November.

If you follow politics, you're probably inundated by news of the 2020 presidential race by now. But did you know that 2019 is an election year too? This month, five states will hold big general elections.

Voters in Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia will elect either a whole slew of state lawmakers or a governor and other statewide executives. Or, in the case of Louisiana and Mississippi, all of the above.

Daniel Jayo / AP

Center-left candidate Alberto Fernández has been elected as Argentina’s new president in the hope he will restore the country’s economy. 

Fernández secured more than 45 percent of the vote needed to win and beat conservative outgoing president Mauricio Macri. Fernández ran as part of the Peronist party, which generally favors pro-worker policies. He's promising to rescue the country’s economy and improve the standard of living of residents through hire wages. 

Among all the other things that transpired at and around President Trump's reelection campaign in Minneapolis Thursday night, his team played the music of a hometown hero: Prince's "Purple Rain." Soon after, the estate of Minnesota's late musical hero made it clear just how unhappy it was — and

Microsoft says a hacker group with ties to Iran has targeted a U.S. presidential campaign, in the latest sign that foreign governments may try to influence the 2020 election.

Miami Herald

Until this week, most Florida Democrats were circumspect about calling for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

For some, the release of the Mueller report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and accusations that Trump obstructed justice in that investigation were more than enough. Still, some Florida Democrats largely avoided the word "impeachment."

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

About 25 Democrats in Key West gathered at Shanna Key, an Irish pub, to watch the debate.

Bert Sise is chairwoman of the Democratic Party in Monroe County.

She was watching to see the candidates address a couple issues in particular.

"Climate change for sure. For sure. Because all of our lives in South Florida are going to be impacted by what happens in the next couple of decades," she said.

While the spotlight was on the candidates Wednesday evening, Sise says local party members have an important role to play in the election and in national politics.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN News

Coming fresh off of the rush after a reelection campaign kickoff rally in Orlando on Tuesday, President Trump flew to Miami and appeared briefly before an eager crowd of supporters on the tarmac at Miami International airport about a half hour before midnight.

 

President Trump arrived in the Air Force One and stepped out to greet a crowd of about a hundred at around 11:25 p.m. He made no statements to the press.

 

Needle Exchanges Find New Champions Among Republicans

May 9, 2019
Sammy Mack / WLRN News

Once repellent to conservative politicians, needle exchanges are now being endorsed and legalized in Republican-controlled states.

At least four legislatures have considered bills to allow hypodermic needle exchanges, and two states, Georgia and Idaho, made them legal this year. In each of these states, the House and Senate are controlled by Republicans and the governor is a Republican.

After high turnout in last year's midterm elections propelled Democrats to a new House majority and big gains in the states, several Republican-controlled state legislatures are attempting to change voting-related rules in ways that might reduce future voter turnout.

In a deeply divided America, a casual political debate can easily spiral into a shouting match — even if both parties set out to keep things civil. So how can we talk about thorny issues with people who fundamentally disagree with us?

Pete Buttigieg, a Democratic presidential candidate and the mayor of a small, majority-white city, came to New York this week to appeal to black voters.

"I believe an agenda for black Americans needs to include five things that all of us care about: homeownership, entrepreneurship, education, health and justice," the mayor of South Bend, Ind., told the audience at the National Action Network's conference.

Civility is a nice sentiment — but it's harder to put into practice.

Take a contentious debate last year in the Maine House of Representatives over a proposal to ban conversion therapy — a discredited treatment designed to make gay people straight.

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