politics

Just before the Democratic debate Sunday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put out guidelines encouraging Americans not to gather in groups of 50 or more for the next eight weeks.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

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Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the 11th Democratic presidential debate, on Sunday, is set to look and sound quite different from the previous 10.

To prevent further transmission of the virus, the Democratic National Committee announced Thursday it will hold the debate in Washington, D.C., with no live audience, instead of its original planned location of Arizona, one of four states voting on Tuesday.

Politics and governing can often collide in the middle of a crisis, especially when both hinge on what message a leader is sending the public. Given that we're in the height of an election, the collision may have been inevitable.

President Trump delivered a primetime televised address about coronavirus and canceled political events, followed by a Rose Garden press conference flanked by public and private sector leaders.

Louisiana will delay its presidential primary election by more than two months over coronavirus fears, becoming the first state to do so.

The state had more than 35 presumptive positive test results for people with coronavirus as of Friday morning.

The primary had been scheduled for April 4 but will now be on June 20.

As the cases of known coronavirus infections multiply worldwide, restrictions are increasing on international travel as well.

Updated at 1:43 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is planning to stay in the 2020 Democratic presidential race despite another disappointing primary night.

Two weeks ago, Sanders was the unlikely front-runner for the nomination. Now former Vice President Joe Biden has consolidated support so rapidly, and won so many states, that Sanders is facing calls to drop out of the race.

But Sanders announced his intention to press on in a statement on Wednesday.

American Alan Gross, a prisoner in Cuba for five years during the Obama administration, is accusing Bernie Sanders of commending the communist country when the senator came to visit him behind bars.

Sanders visited Cuba as part of a congressional delegation in 2014, along with Sens. Heidi Heitkamp and Jon Tester.

During the one-hour meeting, Sanders told the prisoner that he didn't understand why others criticized Cuba, Gross said in an interview with NPR.

Maria Esquinca / WLRN

Dozens gathered in front of Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio’s Doral office on Thursday to protest his vote to acquit President Donald Trump on two articles of impeachment. 

Whether you think the new decade starts at midnight Tuesday or a year from then, the eve of 2020 seems like a good time to look back on the top political stories of the 2010s.

Republican Governors Association
Courtesy of the Republican Governors Association / WLRN

Twenty three out of the 27 Republican Governors around the U.S. are in South Florida this week. Thursday was the second - and final day - of the annual Republican Governors Association Conference at a resort in Boca Raton. 

The association's goal is to help get Republican politicians get elected as governors across the country, as well as  provide them with some resources. 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

More than 20 Republican governors from across the U.S. are in Boca Raton discussing electoral strategy and other issues at an annual party gathering.

The two-day Republican Governors Association conference Wednesday and Thursday at the Boca Raton Resort and Club allows the governors to share policy initiatives in their respective states. It comes after the party suffered defeats in the Kentucky and Louisiana governor’s races and a win in a Mississippi gubernatorial contest earlier in November.

If you follow politics, you're probably inundated by news of the 2020 presidential race by now. But did you know that 2019 is an election year too? This month, five states will hold big general elections.

Voters in Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia will elect either a whole slew of state lawmakers or a governor and other statewide executives. Or, in the case of Louisiana and Mississippi, all of the above.

Daniel Jayo / AP

Center-left candidate Alberto Fernández has been elected as Argentina’s new president in the hope he will restore the country’s economy. 

Fernández secured more than 45 percent of the vote needed to win and beat conservative outgoing president Mauricio Macri. Fernández ran as part of the Peronist party, which generally favors pro-worker policies. He's promising to rescue the country’s economy and improve the standard of living of residents through hire wages. 

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