pollution

Bibi Andrade

Miami Beach joined the ranks of South Florida cities battling aging sewer systems when three sewer line breaks knocked out half the city’s sewer capacity last week, dumping nearly 1.4 million gallons of raw sewage into Biscayne Bay.

After a driller working on a Florida Power & Light drainage well ruptured a 42-inch main line near Lincoln Road, pressure shifted to a frail, 30-inch line installed a half century ago, Public Works Director Roy Coley said Tuesday.

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Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Pollution from auto emissions has gone up 55 percent in the Tampa Bay area since 1990, according to a nationwide analysis the New York Times published last week.

The numbers are nearly the same or worse for other parts of the state during that time period: a 53 percent increase in the Jacksonville area; 58 percent in the Dade-Broward region; 61 percent in the Sarasota-Bradenton area; 98 percent in the Orlando region; and a whopping 126 percent in Naples.

The World Health Organization says there's not enough evidence to conclude that microplastics — which exist nearly everywhere in the environment and show up in drinking water — pose any risk to human health, but it cautions that more research is needed to draw firm conclusions.

MIAMI FREEDOM LLC

Miami City Manager Emilio Gonzalez ordered the closure of Melreese golf course, Miami’s only city-owned golf course, at the end of the day Tuesday, one day after an environmental analysis revealed high levels of arsenic and other pollutants in the soil where David Beckham plans to build a stadium to host his upcoming Major League Soccer team Inter Miami.

Miami Freedom Park

The proposed site for a Major League Soccer stadium and mall in Miami is far more toxic than previously expected, with arsenic contamination levels reaching more than twice the legal limit and surface-level soil samples containing debris that poses a “physical hazard.”

Miami Herald archives

It’s been a tough summer for South Florida beaches, which have faced hot weather, seaweed and high bacteria levels.

Miami Herald archives

A new study from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration looking at 20 years worth of data on pollution has found a new risk threatening Biscayne Bay: "regime change."

The avalanche of plastic waste that's rolling over land and sea has inspired numerous potential solutions. Some involve inventing our way out of the mess by creating new kinds of natural materials that will harmlessly degrade if they're thrown away.

Others say it might be quicker to change people's throwaway behavior instead.

The Florida Everglades can be a contentious place. Politicians, conservationists and farmers never seem to agree on much.

Debate among scientists tends to be collegial. But a new study on coral and the Florida Keys that gained national headlines last week has reignited a decades-old dispute over pollution and the Everglades.

 

Robert Azmitia / Sun Sentinel

A heavily contaminated waste site in southern Broward County will go on a federal list for expedited cleanup, after decades of work failed to remove thousands of gallons of oil and other pollutants from the soil.

Updated at 5:44 p.m. ET

Darrell Blatchley received a call from the Philippines' Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources early Friday morning reporting that it had a young Cuvier's beaked whale that was weak and vomiting blood.

Within a few hours it was dead.

Blatchley, a marine biologist and environmentalist based in the Philippine city of Davao, gathered his team to drive two hours to where the whale had washed up.

Pollution, much like wealth, is not distributed equally in the United States.

Scientists and policymakers have long known that black and Hispanic Americans tend to live in neighborhoods with more pollution of all kinds, than white Americans. And because pollution exposure can cause a range of health problems, this inequity could be a driver of unequal health outcomes across the U.S.

St. Petersburg leaders have settled a lawsuit filed by environmental groups in 2016 after the city released millions of gallons of sewage into Tampa Bay. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Almost a year after Hurricane Irma, cleaning up the Florida Keys is an ongoing project. A local volunteer group is tackling one of the most difficult tasks — removing all the stuff that got washed into the mangrove shorelines along the island chain.

Amy Green / WMFE

As Florida struggles with 'red tide' algae blooms on the west coast and blue-green algae in inland waterways, a federal program to help communities deal with harmful algae outbreaks is set to lose its Congressional authorization at the end of September.

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