power grid

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

Firefighters in Northern California on Monday tried to take advantage of a break in the historically high winds whipping the region to battle the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County wine country before the another round of winds arrives in force on Tuesday.

Energy companies in Florida have begun preparations to assist with an emergency response as millions could lose power during Hurricane Dorian.

Updated at 4:15 a.m. ET on Monday:

The lights came back on late Sunday for some 44 million people in Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay after the sudden collapse of an interconnected South American power grid.

At about 7 a.m., the Edesur electric utility tweeted that "a massive failure" left Argentina and Uruguay without power. Electricity was not fully restored until late in the day.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

Florida’s Public Service Commission (FPSC) has new recommendations to improve electrical systems after a hurricane. 

In their new report, “Review of Florida’s Electric Utility Hurricane Preparedness and Restoration Actions 2018,” the FPSC used data collected from past hurricane reviews and identified tree trimming, underground power lines and utility workers as critical areas to hurricane preparedness.

power lines FPL
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

Peter Haden / WLRN

With hurricane season fast approaching, Florida Power and Light is testing its systems — and more than 3,000 employees — to make sure they can get the lights back on quickly after a storm.

All this week at the Riviera Beach command center, the company is drilling for a hypothetical storm with characteristics similar to Hurricane Wilma, which struck Florida in 2005.

The company said it’s applying lessons learned from Hurricane Irma.

Tim Padgett / WLRN News

RIO PIEDRAS – Puerto Rico’s government says power should be fully restored to the island by mid-December. But that’s three months after Hurricane Maria demolished the U.S. territory. And some fear that Puerto Rico’s most vulnerable people can’t wait that long.