race

Gerard Albert III / WLRN News

While barbers swept fallen hair from the floor of Fweago Cutz barber shop, guests and volunteers set up folding chairs and a projector.

After the lights were off and the crowd was seated, Jefferson Noel pressed play.

The community organizer rented out the barbershop to screen the new Netflix series, "When They See Us." More importantly, he set up a candid panel discussion with former public defendants and activists in the community to discuss the issues that come up in the story.

Screengrab police bodycam video

A Miami-Dade police officer who was caught on video throwing a young black woman to the ground and arresting her after she called for help is now facing charges from that incident. 

A crowd instantly formed around Ronald Seaman when they saw what he could do.

The masked man with pointy ears jutting up from the side of his helmet rolled his wheelchair into the lobby of the Robert W. Saunders Public Library, dressed head-to-toe in black and gold armor, holding a fake weapon with a pseudo-spear attached.

Then, suddenly, his chair elevated him to a standing position. Everyone stopped and stared.

This Tuesday's Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans has thrust into the spotlight a controversial local tradition dating back more than 100 years.

Every year, members of the city's Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club don grass skirts, feather headdresses and bone jewelry for the Mardi Gras parade.

The Zulus' African-American members — and even some of their white members — also paint their faces black.

Karla Mosley wants you to know that people with eating disorders look like her too.

"I'm a woman of color and I certainly didn't know that people like me had eating disorders," she says. "I thought it was a white, rich, female, adolescent disorder."

Only one of those identifiers fits Mosley who's black and binged and purged for years. But Mosley, an actor and a regular on the day time soap, The Bold and the Beautiful, is sharing her story of battling bulimia and getting her health back.

Alexia Fodere / Miami Herald

The Wharf Miami is one of the go-to places along the Miami River.

Sunday evening, when Miami DJ Sam Sneak tried to get into the outdoor culinary and music space, he said he was turned away for violating their dress code, according to posts on his Instagram and Twitter accounts.

Marvel's Black Panther is up for seven Academy Awards this Sunday.

It could be the first superhero movie to win for best picture. Its costume designer Ruth Carter is an Oscar nominee. The film is nominated for best original score and best original song.

Associated Press

For the first time in 26 years, a Florida police officer is standing trial for an on-duty killing — and one of his defenses will be the state's controversial "stand your ground" law.

In 1964, the New Yorker dispatched the writer Richard Rovere to follow Barry Goldwater, the senator from Arizona, as he crisscrossed the country in his ultimately doomed bid for the presidency. A central plank of Goldwater's campaign was that federal involvement in state and local affairs had gone dangerously too far.

A recent study out of Oregon suggests emergency medical responders — EMTs and paramedics — may be treating minority patients differently from the way they treat white patients.

Specifically, the scientists found that black patients in their study were 40 percent less likely to get pain medication than their white peers.

Raimundo Atesiano told a federal judge in Miami the pressure simply became too great for him to bear.

Crime rates in Biscayne Park, Fla., a village of about 3,200 people, remained stubbornly stagnant, and as the town's new police chief, Atesiano just couldn't stand for it. Plus, he wanted to impress elected officials by achieving a 100 percent crime-solving rate.

Growing up in Portugal's capital Lisbon, Beatriz Gomes Dias says she couldn't identify with the people she saw on TV, in ads or in museums. Her parents were immigrants from Guinea-Bissau, a former Portuguese colony in West Africa. There were other black Portuguese, but Gomes Dias says she felt invisible.

"I remember being a child, looking at the majority of Portuguese people and not being like them, and not having a place for me and people like me," she says.

When she was in graduate school for public health, Niasha Fray found a job she loved: counseling women with breast cancer about sticking to their treatment.

She offered what's called "motivational interviewing," a type of therapy intended to help women overcome obstacles keeping them from taking their medications — which can have unpleasant side effects

"They had just given up so much of their lives, so much of their bodies, so much of their family," Fray says. "They wanted to get back to life as usual."

Another producer of a Spanish-language play in Miami is apologizing for showing a character in blackface.

COURTESY OF JAMARAH AMANI

When Jamarah Amani sent her daughter to a one-week STEM summer camp at the University of Miami, she expected her 12-year old to come home excited to share all of the cool things she was learning about science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Instead, on the second day of camp, Mahoro Amani told her mom that she was called the n-word and a derogatory term for lesbian by a white camp participant.

“She didn't come home and tell me, ‘This is what I learned in camp today.’ She came home and said,  ‘I was called a n----r to my face.”

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