race

WLRN Education reporter Jessica Bakeman spent time talking to black students at Miami Country Day School, a private institution with a predominantly white student body. According to the students, racism presents itself in many ways.

Bakeman reports on Sundial:

Courtesy of Harry Castiblanco

Since January, the Teatro Trail in Little Havana has been showing the play, “Tres Viudas en un Crucero” (“Three Widows on a Cruise”), to sold-out crowds. The Spanish-language production featured a blackface character. A fair-skinned actress wore brown face makeup and overdrawn big red lips.

 

The theater recently decided to eliminate blackface from the play after an El Nuevo Herald report denouncing it. 

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Actress Roseanne Barr says she was "Ambien tweeting" at 2 in the morning when she posted a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett, a former senior adviser in the Obama White House, that caused ABC to cancel her TV show.

A simultaneous training session for 175,000 employees, across more than 8,000 stores — that's what Starbucks is doing Tuesday, urging its workers and managers to discuss racial bias and respect following the arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia store last month.

For the sessions, many Starbucks stores will shut down in the afternoon and stay closed for several hours. A sign at one location in Chicago, for instance, says the store will be locking its doors at 2:30 p.m. and reopening on Wednesday. Other stores have posted similar notices.

Fair housing advocates are suing the Department of Housing and Urban Development to compel it to follow a rule meant to help prevent segregation and comply with the Fair Housing Act. The suit, which also names HUD Secretary Ben Carson, was filed Tuesday morning.

Mikayla Sharrieff, India Skinner and Bria Snell should only be proud this week.

The 17-year-olds, all juniors at Benjamin Banneker High School in Washington, D.C., created a simple way using copper shards, drinking straws and filter floss — simple, though I am not smart enough to understand it — to demonstrate how to purify water in school drinking fountains that may be contaminated by lead.

They tested and even tasted the water. Their rudimentary purifier works.

Nadege Green / WLRN News

Hours after a cell phone video captured the moment when a City of Miami police officer kicked a handcuffed man in the head, his sisters walked into a community meeting seeking answers.

There are now well over 1,000 colleges and universities that don't require SAT or ACT scores in deciding whom to admit, a number that's growing every year. And a new study finds that scores on those tests are of little value in predicting students' performance in college, and raises the question: Should those tests be required at all?

Editor's note: This report contains language and an image some may find offensive or upsetting.

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice stands high on a hillside overlooking downtown Montgomery, Ala. Beyond the buildings you can see the winding Alabama River and hear the distant whistle of a train — the nexus that made the city a hub for the domestic slave trade.

"I will never be fired," professor Randa Jarrar taunted critics after she blasted Barbara Bush as a racist not an hour after the former first lady's death was announced last week.

And the president of California State University, Fresno, has confirmed that she will keep her job.

The arrests of two black men waiting for a friend at a Philadelphia Starbucks continues to fuel conversations about implicit racial bias in public spaces. Many of those conversations begin with "I'm not surprised."

"When I have to move through predominately white spaces I'm always on alert and my anxiety is always high because I don't know what's going to happen at that moment," says Elon James White.

Updated at 1:56 p.m. ET

A video that's now amassed almost 7 million views on Twitter depicts police officers handcuffing two black men in a Philadelphia Starbucks.

Onlookers in the background are incredulous.

"What did they do?" one man asks.

"They didn't do anything," a woman responds. "I saw the entire thing."

A 14-year-old African-American boy stopped to ask for directions to school in a Detroit suburb but was shot at instead, according to prosecutors.

Retired firefighter Jeffery Zeigler, 53, who is white, was arraigned on Friday "on assault with intent to murder and felony firearm" charges, according to the Oakland County Sheriff's Office.

Brennan Walker of Rochester Hills, Mich., says he overslept and missed the bus to school Thursday morning. He didn't have his phone. He tried to trace the bus route, but ended up lost and began knocking on doors for directions.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Louisiana has declined to press charges against the pair of white police officers involved in the 2016 shooting death of Alton Sterling. The state's attorney general, Jeff Landry, announced the decision at a news conference Tuesday, saying that a months-long review of the incident failed to uncover evidence that either police officer could be held criminally responsible for Sterling's death.

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