racial segregation

Eleonora Edreva / WLRN

At a heated commission meeting in April, Deerfield Beach city commissioners narrowly approved a townhouse development on the site of a former cemetery.

This three-acre plot of land was not just any cemetery. During segregation, it was the only place in Deerfield Beach where the black community was allowed to bury its dead. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Until this past weekend South Florida had been relatively quiet amid a large, nationwide protest movement in response to several killings by police officers.

That changed Friday, when around 400 protesters shut down Interstate-195 in Miami. It was rush hour during Art Basel weekend.

There was a smaller protest in Fort Lauderdale -- around 100 people -- on Saturday and another Sunday in Miami maxing out at 200 people.

A new map clearly demarcates the racial divide in the United States through colorful dots, showing the demographics of South Florida and highlighting the striking partitions of how we live.

For example, most people know that Miami Beach is primarily a mix of white and Hispanic and that North Miami is mostly white east of Biscayne Boulevard and predominantly black on the west side. But there is more that can be read into the map.