racism

When news broke that California Sen. Kamala Harris was dropping out of the presidential race on Tuesday, some fellow Democratic candidates quickly began ringing alarm bells. Harris was the only nonwhite candidate to have qualified for the next presidential debate on Dec. 19.

"What we're staring at is a DNC debate stage in a few days with no people of color on it, that does not reflect the diversity of our party or our country," former Housing Secretary Julián Castro said. "We need to do better than that."

Josh Ritchie / South Florida Sun Sentinel

W. George Allen, a hugely influential figure in Broward history and its black community, has died, his family confirmed Thursday. He was 83.

In 1962, Allen became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Florida. He once said: “I was admitted to Harvard and the University of California at Berkeley, but I’m a native Floridian, and I felt that somebody had to integrate the University of Florida. The racists told me I didn’t belong there and I’d never graduate.”

Jeromy Brown, a 46-year-old teacher in Iowa, considers President Trump a white supremacist.

"If the shoe fits, then say it, and the shoe fits him," Brown said, while waiting in a photo line at an Elizabeth Warren rally in August. "Why should he be excused from that label?"

Shane Gillis, the comedian who has been under fire over the past few days for using racist and homophobic slurs on his podcast, has been fired from Saturday Night Live.

Gillis was one of three cast members recently added to the show, which is set to begin its 45th season. But the comedian was canned on Monday before ever making an appearance on the show.

"After talking with Shane Gillis, we have decided that he will not be joining SNL," a spokesperson said in a statement on behalf of producer Lorne Michaels.

Senate Resolution Condemning White Supremacy Off To Rocky Start

Aug 19, 2019

Senate Republican leaders say the first step toward preventing mass violence is condemning white nationalism and white supremacy as “hateful, dangerous and morally corrupt,” according to a draft resolution made public on Friday.

But Senate Democrats want to see the chamber do more. 

Former President Barack Obama weighed in on the mass shootings this past weekend in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, saying on Monday that Americans "should soundly reject language coming out of the mouths of any of our leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalizes racist sentiments."

In a statement released on Twitter, Obama did not mention President Trump by name, but his reference seemed clear.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

An administrative judge with the New York Police Department has recommended that Officer Daniel Pantaleo be fired for his role in the 2014 death of Eric Garner.

The judge found Pantaleo guilty of using a banned chokehold but did not find him guilty of intentionally restricting Garner's breathing. Garner's repeated cry of "I can't breathe" triggered national outrage and galvanized activists concerned about police use of force.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson made a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday and renewed his defense of President Trump's disparaging comments about the city, and reiterated his own critique of the city where he lived for more than three decades.

"There are good things in Baltimore. There are bad things in Baltimore," Carson told reporters near a recently renovated affordable housing development. "But there are problems and we can't sweep them under the rug."

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

One week ago, President Trump said in a tweet that four Democratic freshman Congresswomen "go back" and "help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." All of the representatives are U.S. citizens. Three were born here. 

Democrats widely criticized the tweets. Republicans mostly stayed silent. Trump denied the comments were racist.

The racist rhetoric from President Trump attacking four freshmen Democratic women, who he tweeted should "go back" to their countries of origin, escalated Wednesday night at his campaign rally in North Carolina.

"Send her back," the crowd chanted, during a riff in which the president criticized Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar, a Somali-born American citizen from Minnesota.

Jenny Abreu / Courtesy of the Lowe

Billie Grace Lynn remembers her childhood in Alexandria, Louisiana at a time when segregation still plagued a significant part of the deep south. Now an artist, those memories have deeply affected the way she sees and portrays the subject of race in her work.

Lynn is a professor of sculpture at the University of Miami, and her latest exhibit, "A House Divided," is on display until Sept. 15 at the Lowe Art Museum. It focuses on racial discrimination, identity politics and civic engagement throughout U.S. history.

 

Updated at on July 18 at 1:52 p.m. ET

President Trump continued his attacks against four freshman Democratic congresswomen at a campaign rally in Greenville, N.C., on Wednesday, with the crowd breaking into a chant of "send her back" against one, echoing the president's racist message from the weekend.

Trump on Thursday disavowed the chant.

Updated at 7:05 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved a resolution Tuesday evening condemning the president for a series of racist tweets about four Democratic lawmakers.

The vote was mostly along party lines, as the House split 240-187, with four Republicans supporting the nonbinding measure.

Associated Press

On Sunday, President Trump tweeted that four first-year Democratic members of Congress should all "go back" where they came from. The president's comments were aimed at representatives who are women of color — all of them American citizens, three of them born in the U.S. 

When President Trump tweeted his racist remarks Sunday, asking why certain Democratic congresswomen don't just "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came," he did not just take aim at the four women of color — three of whom were born in the U.S.

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