restoration

New River Inn
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Fort Lauderdale’s New River Inn has worn many hats since it was built in 1905. It started as a railroad hotel in 1905, then it became city offices. In 1977 it became the original site of the Museum of Discovery and Science before it became what it is today, a museum for the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society

Daniel Bock / Miami Herald

Biscayne Bay used to be a subtropical paradise with clear water and colorful coral. But urbanization and population growth have polluted the water and imperiled fish, birds, manatees and plants, particularly seagrass.  

Kate Stein / WLRN

If you scoop a glassful of water from the heart of the Everglades, that water is as pure and clear as the water that flows from your tap.

That’s because chances are good your tap water comes from the Everglades.

One in three Floridians -- more than eight million of us -- gets drinking water from the Biscayne Aquifer a few feet below the southeastern Everglades. The ecosystem acts as a natural filter, removing excess nutrients and keeping out seawater.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Let’s start with what we’re losing: 

One of the most biologically diverse places on Earth, from sawgrass to cypress trees, apple snails to alligators. The historic home of Florida’s Miccosukee and Seminole tribes. A national park.

The ecosystem that ensures fresh drinking water for more than 8 million Floridians.

Everglades advocate Marjory Stoneman Douglas talked about all this in an interview in 1983.

Martin County Health Department

A bill to build water storage reservoirs south of Lake Okeechobee was introduced in Florida’s legislature on Thursday, formalizing a controversial plan by Senate President Joe Negron.