Riviera Beach

Visual Content / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Riviera Beach city council voted to let the city’s insurer pay 65 bitcoin to get access to city data and computer systems blocked by a cyber attack three weeks ago.

The difficult-to-trace digital currency’s value fluctuates, but 65 Bitcoin is worth roughly $600,000. Council members discussed the ransom at a special meeting held Monday night.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Stonybrook Apartments in Riviera Beach have a long history of substandard living conditions.

The tenants are fighting to improve their living conditions at the federally-subsidized complex and recently filed a lawsuit.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Riviera Beach city council will vote on a series of items that would clear the way for the purchase of a troubled housing complex at a special meeting Monday. 

Nadege Green / WLRN

Edna House is parting her daughter’s hair into small neat triangle ponytails while the three-year old watches cartoons inside their apartment. The pair was abruptly moved into this unit a week ago.

House says she complained for more than a year to the management at the Stonybrook Apartments that her last apartment had a mold problem.

“They knew what was going on and yet they still did nothing,” she says. “I complain and complain and they saw me as like a nuisance.”

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

It's not that uncommon to hear someone complaining that politicians are corrupt. But you wouldn't expect to be thrown in jail for it.

That's exactly what happened to Fane Lozman at a City Council meeting in Florida.

PBS

Today in Sundial: The Palm Beach Post recently published a story about how Riviera Beach city leaders are spending taxpayer dollars. It showed city commissioners and the mayor had taken numerous trips, stayed at expensive hotels and even on pet projects. We'll hear from the Post reporter Tony Doris and Riviera Beach Mayor Thomas Masters.

Fane Lozman

Before 2013, Florida’s houseboats were considered sea vessels rather than homes - but that all changed when activist and developer Fane Lozman took his case to the U. S. Supreme Court.

 

Lozman gained national attention in 2013 when the court ruled in his favor after the city of Riviera Beach demolished the houseboat he was living in,  arguing that  it did not qualify as a residence. Last Sunday, Lozman returned to Riviera Beach with a new houseboat in tow.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Florida man's floating home was a house, not a boat, and that therefore, the city marina where he kept it docked could not seize the structure under federal maritime law. The case could affect thousands of houseboat owners nationwide.