School Safety

Katie Lepri / WLRN News

Hours before the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Governor Ron DeSantis ordered an audit of discipline programs across Florida schools and announced he has requested the Florida Supreme Court to create a statewide grand jury panel to look into the shooting and actions that could have prevented it.

It's hard to empathize with someone who carries out a school shooting. The brutality of their crimes is unspeakable. Whether the shootings were at Columbine, at Sandy Hook, or in Parkland, they have traumatized students and communities across the U.S.

Robert Runcie Protest
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

About a dozen parents with signs and red banners gathered in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Monday evening to protest the leadership of Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie.

The protest took place while Rundie was holding a private meeting with parents of 10th-grade students at Stoneman Douglas. 

Associated Press

The newest member of the powerful state board that regulates education in Florida is singularly focused on ousting the superintendent of the state's second-largest school district.

Associated Press / WLRN

Jessica Levenson remembers the armed guards with bullet proof vests and rifles on campus after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. 

"It made me feel unnerved," she said. 

She said it made Nova High, in Davie, feel more like prison than high school. 

Despite appreciating the extra security, which the Florida Legislature implemented to make school campuses feel safer, she felt less secure.  

Daniel Varela / Miami Herald

Code Reds, hard corners, and arming teachers are some of the recommendations made by the state commission investigating the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

 

The commission submitted its report to the state Legislature a day after the New Year. It’s more than 400 pages long and goes into detail about what led to Feb. 14th, 2018 – and what could be done to prevent a school shooting in the future.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

Members of The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission voted unanimously Wednesday morning to send their first report to the state authorities in Tallahassee, in hopes that it increases the pace of reforms recommended to prevent another school shooting in Florida. 

David Santiago / Miami Herald

Better law enforcement and stronger school security are the big takeaways from the draft report released this week by the state commission investigating the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Emily Michot / WLRN News

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School teachers and students separately protested the abrupt transfer of three administrators and a security guard as part of an ongoing investigation into mistakes leading up and following the Feb. 14 shooting that left 17 people dead on campus.

About 60 teachers stood in a line in front of the Parkland high school early Tuesday morning, some holding signs that read: "Who is this helping?" A few hours later, a few hundred students walked out of class and gathered in a park down the street, a few chanting, "Bring them back!"

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

A Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School administrator who predicted Nikolas Cruz might become a school shooter — and joked with others that the troubled student might target him specifically — is among the latest people to face consequences for missteps in handling the Feb. 14 shooting there.

Stoneman Douglas Assistant Principal Jeff Morford and three other staff members will be reassigned, Broward County Public Schools announced Monday.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

The FBI plans to hire more staff and implement technology upgrades to its public tipline after mishandling two warnings that confessed Parkland killer Nikolas Cruz might shoot up a school.

As the nation’s eyes were on Broward County, Florida, for a flawed, week long election recount, a state commission a few miles away was investigating the county government’s role in the Feb. 14 massacre at a Parkland high school. It found that failed leadership, inconsistent or unenforced policies, and misinformation contributed to the 17 deaths.

Pages