sea-level rise

NOAA GOES satellite imagery

Hurricane Dorian spared South Florida from the worst of the winds, rain and storm surge. There were no mass evacuations. Power outages were few. But there was plenty of anxiety.

Sea levels are rising, and that is sending more ocean water into streets, sewers and homes. For people who live and work in coastal communities, that means more otherwise-sunny days disrupted by flooding.

A new national study concludes that rising sea levels could cost U.S. states more than $400 billion over the next 20 years. And Florida has the highest price tag.

The report is by the environmental advocacy group Center for Climate Integrity. It says Florida would have to pay around $75 billion to build new seawalls to defend against a two-foot sea level rise by 2040.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

It’s almost six months into Gov. Ron DeSantis’s first term, and the biggest shift from the Rick Scott administration has been his focus on the environment.

AL DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD

An expert on the impact of climate change on financial markets has advice for anyone thinking of buying a home in Florida: don’t.

Spencer Glendon of the Woods Hole Research Center said Friday on the Florida Roundup that financial institutions are going to wreck Florida’s economy if they don’t confront the risk to coastal real estate and slow their lending. He warned that home buyers in the state should no longer be receiving 30-year mortgages.

Miami Herald Archive

The Miami Herald and other South Florida media outlets were honored Tuesday with a 2019 NLA Award for a partnership on a series of editorials on sea-level rise.

The Invading Sea: Can South Florida Be Saved? was a partnership of the Miami Herald, South Florida Sun Sentinel, Palm Beach Post and WLRN. The project, led at the Miami Herald by editorial page editor Nancy Ancrum, received the Burl Osborne Award for Editorial Leadership.

Over the past few years, Miami native Trenise Bryant has seen her neighborhood, the African-American enclave of Liberty City, start to change. Bryant grew up in one of the area's oldest public housing projects, Liberty Square. Lately, rents have gone up, and Bryant has seen people priced out and forced to move away.

One factor driving this, Bryant says, is climate change.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The city of Miami announced on Tuesday more than 30 new public infrastructure projects, the initial phase of a multi-year plan to increase the supply of affordable housing, quell flooding and make other city improvements.

J. David Ake / AP

A new bill to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions is being introduced this week in the U.S. House of Representatives, and three of the five sponsors are from Florida.

Leslie Ovalle / The Miami Herald

Sea-level rise can feel like a far-away problem.

Some artists in Miami have been working on an augmented reality project depicting how climate change and sea-level rise could impact Miami, depending on the decisions people make today. 

 

Kate Stein / WLRN

Florida teachers are eager to teach kids about sea-level rise, rising heat and other impacts of climate change, but many say it can be hard to find engaging and in-depth information in their textbooks or the state curriculum.

A workshop on Wednesday offered about 30 Florida educators ideas and resources for climate education.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is starting a three-year, $3 million study to help Miami-Dade County find ways to reduce risk from storms and sea-level rise.

On Thursday, the Corps and the county launched the effort by collecting ideas from local planners, researchers and concerned citizens. For four hours, staff members sat at tables in the Miami Rowing Club on Key Biscayne and facilitated conversations with interested members of the public.

Courtesy of Xavier Cortada

If you’re not sure what to do with your yard signs now that the midterm elections are over, a South Florida artist has a suggestion for you.

Visual artist Xavier Cortada is leading a project to turn political yard signs into markers showing how high people’s homes are above sea level. The goal is to bring people together following the divisive 2018 midterms, and to raise awareness of how sea-level rise can impact South Florida -- from property values to insurance rates to tidal flooding and contamination of drinking water.

AHUREY EM/FLICKR

The City of Boynton Beach will decide Wednesday night whether to become the latest Florida city to join a national coalition dedicated to sea-level rise adaptation.

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