sea level rise

Pedro Portal

Replacing and refurbishing old coastal pumps to brace for sea level rise could cost South Florida tens of millions of dollars per year over the next decade.

In a report to South Florida Water Management District governing board members on Thursday, district hydrology chief Aki Owosina said a review of the 16-county agency found that 26 of the 36 coastal pumps would likely fail to do their job or be in danger of not working. The most vulnerable were in Miami-Dade, Broward and Collier counties.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

A plan for the future of the historic Little Havana neighborhood was released Tuesday after two years of preparation. 

The "Little Havana Me Importa" effort launched in 2017 after the neighborhood was named a national treasure by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Since then, more than 2,700 residents have given their input about the future of their neighborhood through workshops and surveys. The collaboartion is being led by PlusUrbia, the National Trust and private sector developers.

CARL JUSTE CJUSTE@MIAMIHERALD.COM

This story was updated at 4:30 p.m.

Three years after they joined the Rockefeller Foundation to create a grand plan to fight rising seas, climbing temperatures and other worsening climate hazards, three of South Florida’s most threatened places unveiled their blueprint Thursday.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

After two and a half years of work, a comprehensive report on how to better prepare Miami for all kinds of threats -- economic, health and especially climate risks -- is expected to be released by the end of May.

The effort aims to better understand the risks to resiliency. That is the popular word used as a catchall for everything from dealing with housing affordability to recovering after a hurricane to protecting against and adapting to rising seas.

Arianna Prothero / WLRN

An international program that has helped South Florida cities address climate change and other livability challenges is ending. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

First-term U.S. Rep. Donna Shalala says she is working to address climate change in South Florida by pushing for Everglades restoration, carbon fees and federal infrastructure improvements.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

A global conference on climate change resilience in Miami on Tuesday highlighted the city’s efforts to respond to sea level rise and other extreme weather events.  

Led by former United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, representatives from the Global Commission on Adaptation toured the city’s flood prevention projects and met with Miami’s climate resilience leaders. Ban praised the city’s work to address sea level rise, saying Miami is a model for other places around the world under threat from climate change.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Miami has renamed one of its Downtown waterfront parks after the city’s first-ever Latino mayor.

Museum Park, the 30-acre green space that neighbors Perez Art Museum and overlooks Port Miami, will now be known as Maurice A. Ferré Park. The city commission officially rededicated the park at a grand ceremony on Thursday after voting unanimously in December on the name change.

As Ferré, 83, now battles cancer, attendees praised him for making Miami into an internationally-renowned center.

Andrew Quintana / WLRN

Miami-Dade County is offering people the chance to learn more about sea-level rise and how to prepare for it with a free training. The course, which is only two hours long, shows how to use online tools that map out different scenarios of sea level rise in South Florida.

Caitie Switaski / WLRN

Governor Ron DeSantis is receiving high praise from some environmental groups for his quick action focused on the Everglades. Last week, the governor called for $2.5 billion for Everglades restoration and combatting red tide and blue-green algae across the state. He also empowered two separate task forces, one on toxic algae and another dedicated to sea-level rise. And he called for the resignation of the entire South Florida Water Management District governing board.

COURTESY OF XAVIER CORTADA

A newly created 'Underwater Homeowners Association' held its first meeting in The Village of Pinecrest Wednesday. The group is made up of residents who want to tackle the issue of sea level rise as a community. It is also the finishing touch on a piece created by environmental artist Xavier Cortada.

“Today is the day where I conceptually sign the painting,” Cortada said.

Stephanie Russo / Monroe County

Flooding is a fact of life in the low-lying Florida Keys. And it's projected to get worse. According to Monroe County, this is the third most vulnerable county in the country to tidal flooding.

Tom Hudson / WLRN News

Water is what connects us in South Florida. No matter where we are from or how we got here, or where we live or work, water surrounds us. And this time of year, the rising seas, driven by the pull of the sun and moon, can spill over our edges, bubble up from below and seep into our lives.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Visitors to a haunted house in Delray Beach last weekend were greeted by a mermaid living in a trash heap and pictures of a polluted ocean projected onto the wall.

The next room was even more bleak. The polar ice caps had melted, and everyone in coastal areas drowned.

Further into the house, a girl left bloody handprints as she banged on a window from the outside, and a boy lay on a gurney, spinning an electric drill and mumbling about applesauce. They were both driven mad by a new epidemic gripping the post-apocalyptic world.

Andrew Quintana / WLRN

A town hall in Wynwood on Monday night involved an issue that has flooded the minds and neighborhoods of many South Florida residents—rising sea waters.

The event, hosted by WLRN, was open to the public and featured artists, scientists, and policymakers who spoke about the threat of sea level rise in South Florida and what communities can do in response to it. It was a conversation attendees said they were eager to have.

But one area that was not up for debate was the science.