sen. amy klobuchar

How confident are Iowa Democrats in their choices, now two weeks out from the caucuses?

The response Renee Kleinpeter gave NPR when asked which candidates she has narrowed her choice down to could sum it up: four seconds of laughter.

"I'll go with anybody who could beat [President] Trump," she said after laughing. "I wish somebody could tell me."

There are now no more official debates before Democrats begin voting.

Tuesday night's debate was the last before the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3, and it featured six of the 12 remaining candidates — the top four of whom polls show to be neck and neck.

Democratic primary voters got a substantive debate in which the candidates clashed over what it means to be commander in chief, gender politics and, of course, health care.

Here are four takeaways from Tuesday night's debate:

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar opened her time at the latest 2020 Democratic presidential debates with the phrase,  “Houston, we have a problem.” 

Grilling President Trump for leading the country “like a game show” and saying he would rather “lie than lead,” she admitted to not being the loudest candidate for president in the last debate rounds. 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Ahead of the first democratic presidential debates in Miami this month, eight 2020 democratic presidential candidates addressed the fastest growing electorate on burning issues for them in a candidate forum Friday morning. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, on her second visit to Florida since becoming a Democratic presidential candidate, emphasized her support on Tuesday for a universal public health insurance option and also called on the Trump administration to extend Temporary Protected Status to Venezuelans.

During a meeting with Venezuelan exiles in Doral, Klobuchar discussed the ongoing political turmoil in Venezuela and said she approved of recent sanctions against the regime of embattled president Nicolás Maduro.