sharks

State Clamps down On Shore-Based Shark Fishing

Feb 22, 2019

Shore-based anglers will no longer be able to use fish parts, bones and blood to attract sharks, as critics of shark fishing would like to see lines cast farther away from beachgoers.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel reports the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will vote Feb. 20 on a plan to limit the practice and protect swimmers.

Associated Press

Looks like it’s safe to get back in the water.

Shark attacks, still rare despite movie plot lines and one fatal attack this year off Cape Cod, declined dramatically worldwide in 2018 and plummeted by nearly half in Florida waters, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History’s International Shark Attack File, an annual report released Monday morning.

The steep drop, a statistical anomaly, suggests swimmers may be getting better at heeding warnings, research director Gavin Naylor said in a statement.

courtesy: George Schellenger

Guy Harvey’s art is more often worn then hung.

His watercolors and pen and ink drawings, of marlins, mako sharks and mahi, are on t-shirts, hats and even dog collars. He has been licensing his artwork to put on clothes since the late 1980s.

Ross Elliott / Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of blacktip sharks ordinarily swim languidly off the South Florida coast. But this year the shark count is down substantially and warmer water temperatures may be the reason.

A researcher at Florida Atlantic University says a recent tally he did off Palm Beach County during the sharks' annual migration had a high of only 2,800 blacktip sharks. That's down substantially from the high of more than 12,000 sharks in 2011, according to Florida Atlantic University researcher Stephen Kajiura.

The drop is dramatic, Kajiura said.

This week, Discovery celebrates the 30th anniversary of Shark Week. Do you understand what that means? Nothing! Absolutely nothing!

Well, not nothing. It means that if you are under 30, Shark Week has existed since before you were born. You have never not known Shark Week! On the day you were born, someone could have said, "Boy, I'm really looking forward to Shark Week next year." And the other person would hopefully have squinted and said, "Are you?"

Great white sharks have a "hidden life" that is becoming a lot less hidden thanks to a scientific expedition that has been years in the making.

John Sparks and David Gruber

Miami Herald reporters Andres Viglucci and Nicholas Nehamas recently reported on significant cracks that were found in the Florida International University bridge’s foundation 10 days before its collapse. They spoke on Sundial about their story, “Cracks where FIU bridge buckled may have signaled 'imminent failure.’”

Twitter

Guests for Sundial on Thursday March 15, 2018:

Stephen Kajiura is a professor of biological sciences at Florida Atlantic University. For the last eight years, Kajiura -who specializes in sharks- has been boarding a small plane and flying off the Florida coast surveying the water, recording schools of sharks. He and his team have captured video of thousands of sharks migrating up and down the coast, many of them closer than beach-goers realize. 

Ocearch

George, a great white shark that was nearly 10 feet long and weighed more than 700 pounds when he was tagged a year ago off Nantucket, has paid a visit to Everglades National Park.

At about 5 p.m. Sunday, a satellite tracker picked up the shark when he surfaced off Highland Beach, a remote campsite in the park’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas Wilderness Trail on the southwest coast. It’s the second time the shark has been located close to shore. While tracking can be imprecise, a third inshore ping could provide insight into whether George is becoming a regular Florida tourist.

 

The practice of shark finning — removing a shark’s dorsal fin and discarding the animal’s body back into the water — has been in the political spotlight in recent months.

The Florida Wildlife Federation is pushing for stiffer poaching penalties after a shark dragging video went viral.

Shark Video Could Spark Legislative Action

Aug 8, 2017

As state investigators seek more evidence from the public about a growing number of videos that showcase abuse of sharks, legislation may be filed that seeks to better define state wildlife laws.

Miami Herald

Earlier this month a swimmer was attacked by a shark at Haulover Beach in Miami-Dade County. That person suffered no life-threatening injuries, but the attack was shocking because it was so rare. In the last 135 years, there have only been 15 total attacks in Miami-Dade.

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