Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact

Riane Roldan / WLRN

There's a buzzword among people who work on quality-of-life issues in South Florida: "Resilience."

It’s a concept we often apply to a person, someone who's able to cope with difficult circumstances. But more and more, the word is being used in the context of how communities respond to issues like traffic, hurricanes, affordable housing and rising seas.

Kate Stein / WLRN

After Hurricane Irma, some people with low-wage jobs took weeks to recover the costs of supplies and days of missed work. In parts of the Florida Keys, people spent months rebuilding homes and businesses.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Critics of a Miami-Dade proposal to extend State Road 836 beyond the county's urban development boundary say constructing new highways in South Florida is an outdated solution to traffic problems.

Floydphoto / Wikimedia Commons

Sea-level rise is going to cost Broward County -- and leaders don't know yet how they're going to pay.

A roundtable meeting in Davie on Thursday brought together more than 40 elected officials, city staff and business leaders from across Broward. Many expressed concern over a lack of funding for sea-level rise adaptation projects.

Ron Wallace, the city engineer for Parkland, said he's concerned about drainage in South Florida's current system, which moves water from west to east.

Florida Center for Environmental Studies

If you thought sea-level rise was the greatest immediate threat to South Florida’s future, you may need to think again.

There’s growing concern that the perception of the sea-level rise threat by insurers, banks and investors might submerge South Florida before rising seas do.

Kate Stein / WLRN

In one of Miami-Dade’s most flood-prone areas, county officials on Thursday night collected public input on what to do about water from storms and and rising seas.

Andres Rivero / Courtesy of Miami Mayor's Office

Rowan Douglas feels an emotional draw to statistical risk modeling of natural disasters.

"Two hundred years ago, we created the romantic period of English literature, where man became connected to nature," the executive said. "We are now connecting to nature again, through the majesty of the modeled world."

Lieutenant Elizabeth Crapo, NOAA Corps / via Wikimedia Commons

South Florida’s future looks wet, salty and, unless you’re a mermaid, maybe a bit apocalyptic.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Southeast Florida has a new plan to help communities deal with sea level rise.