storms

Susan Stocker / South Florida Sun Sentinel

Heavy rain from a passing tropical wave will drench South Florida over the next two days, with the impact worsened in coastal neighborhoods by the simultaneous arrival of unusually high tides.

Hit hardest will be coastal Broward and Palm Beach counties, with rainfall totals expected of three to five inches, according to the National Weather Service. But there is a chance rains could be even heavier, with the possibility of up to eight inches in some areas, the weather service said.

National Hurricane Center

The clouds and storms located between South Florida and the northwest Bahamas that have become Tropical Depression Three will likely mean rain and thunderstorms for the region, but forecasters have dialed back the potential for heavy flooding.

The weather system is staying at sea and its heaviest rains are on its east side.

At 5 a.m. Tuesday, Tropical Depression Three was located about 40 miles northeast of West Palm Beach with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm isn’t expected to move over South Florida.

Fox 13 News

South Florida is in a pattern of strong-to-severe thunderstorms through the weekend — with some potential accompanying wind gusts up to 60 mph.

But the downpours could have one possible health benefit. They may keep us from coughing from a large Saharan dust plume expected to blanket much of the Atlantic through Friday and spread into the Caribbean over the weekend and into early next week, according to CBS4 meteorologist Craig Setzer.

People with respiratory issues in the Caribbean ought to be aware, he said.

Brock Long was frustrated. Yet again, the FEMA administrator said, people in the path of a powerful hurricane had ignored evacuation orders.

Hurricane Michael had leveled the small Florida city of Mexico Beach and destroyed large parts of nearby Panama City. The death count was rising as search and rescue workers pulled bodies from the rubble.

In Mexico Beach, Fla., Lance Erwin is one of the lucky ones. His house is still standing. He stayed in his home during Hurricane Michael, several blocks from the beach, in a part of his house that he calls his "safe room."

"The garage door was shaking," he says. "I knew the roof was gone at that point because everything was shaking. I thought, 'Just hang in there.' I had faith everything was going to be OK."

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

A public health state of emergency has been declared in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Medical personnel have been deployed at the national level to respond. A team of seven people from the Orange County Health Department has been sent to help with recovery efforts after Hurricane Michael.

Updated at 4:55 a.m. ET

Tropical Storm Michael rampaged through South Carolina, North Carolina and finally southeastern Virginia on Thursday, before heading for the Atlantic Ocean.

Fast, Furious: How Michael Grew Into A 155 MPH Monster

Oct 11, 2018

Moist air, warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, and ideal wind patterns supercharged Hurricane Michael in the hours before it smacked Florida's Panhandle.

Food Bank Preps For Hurricane Michael

Oct 11, 2018

Hurricane Michael struck Florida’s panhandle with Category Four strength. The Second Harvest of Central Florida is prepping nearly 6,000 boxes to send in aid impacted areas.

Florida Shifts To Search And Rescue After Michael

Oct 10, 2018
NASA via AP

At least 388,000 utility customers lost power as Hurricane Michael crashed ashore --- with potentially catastrophic winds of 155 mph --- between Panama City and St. Vincent Island, before speeding north into Alabama and Georgia on Wednesday.

Time To 'Hunker Down' As Category 4 Michael Nears

Oct 10, 2018

Gov. Rick Scott said Wednesday morning that time has run out for people in coastal areas who debated whether to evacuate ahead of Hurricane Michael, as the powerful Category 4 storm was poised to cause massive damage in the Panhandle.

“It’s too late to get out,” Scott said during an appearance on the Weather Channel. “If you’re in a coastal community, you’ve got to hunker down. You’ve got to do everything you can to keep your family safe.”

Have you heard the theory that low air pressure during a hurricane can cause a surge in births?

Supposedly a steep drop in barometric pressure makes it easier for a baby to pop out.

As Hurricane Florence ripped through the Carolinas, we wondered if that was really true.

"It's one of those old wives' tales," said Dr. Hal Lawrence, executive vice president and CEO of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Farmers across the southeastern part of North Carolina are just starting to report details about the hit they've taken from Hurricane Florence. The rain is over, but rivers still are rising, and the full picture of damage to farms and the surrounding environment probably won't be known for weeks.

Florence is now a tropical depression, but the storm’s danger is far from over. The port city of Wilmington, North Carolina, was cut off Monday because of rising floodwaters.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson heard from Wilmington resident Leslie Hudson as she was waiting in line for gas.

Interview Highlights

On attempting to find gas in Wilmington

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