technology

Patients sitting in emergency rooms, at chiropractors' offices and at pain clinics in the Philadelphia area may start noticing on their phones the kind of messages typically seen along highway billboards and public transit: personal injury law firms looking for business by casting mobile online ads at patients.

The potentially creepy part? They're only getting fed the ad because somebody knows they are in an emergency room.

The FBI significantly over-counted the number of encrypted phones it says are connected to ongoing criminal investigations but remain inaccessible to investigators without back door access.

OrangeSTEM

In South Florida, a regional weather forecast often just doesn't cut it.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Adrien Stephen has his dream job. He got it when he moved from Haiti to Miami 25 years ago -- but even before that, he knew what he wanted to do.

"When I go on the road, I see those guys in the big trucks. I always wanted to be a driver."

Some predict 3D printing could revolutionize everything from manufacturing and medicine, as more people get access to technology that lets them cheaply make their own parts and products.

But the same technology that might one day custom-print heart valves or lead to astronauts manufacturing their own tools aboard the International Space Station could also be used to print bombs and explosives, or make it possible for countries like North Korea and Iran to evade international sanctions.

Tom Hudson

The companies Ron Antevy and Rodrigo Griesi help run are very different. One is homegrown, the other was exported to South Florida from Brazil. One has about 200 people on its local payroll. The other has one local employee, but is part of the global gig-economy -- working with freelancers all over the world. One company is more than 20 years old. The other started only five years ago.

With sensors that can collect data on body movements, heart rate, blood pressure and other metrics, the list of health trackers that go beyond activity trackers like Fitbits gets longer each year.

"There's definitely an explosion of these things," says Dr. Joseph Kvedar, the vice president for connected health at Partners HealthCare in Boston, and an associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School.

courtsey: Citrix Systems

One out of every 100 open jobs advertised in Broward County today is at a single address: the Fort Lauderdale headquarters of the software company Citrix Systems. Citrix CEO David Henshall says the company has postings for 277 positions out of the 21,500 open jobs county-wide, according to Career Source Broward.

Miami's Black Tech Week Sets Its Sights On A National Tour

Feb 12, 2018
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

On the last day of Miami's Black Tech Week conference, about 40 women (and a few men) gathered for the “Women’s Innovation Brunch and Awards” to network and share stories about the challenges of being a woman of color in the disproportionately white, male tech industry.

If the Russian psychologist Ivan Pavlov were alive today, what would he say about smartphones? He might not think of them as phones at all, but instead as remarkable tools for understanding how technology can manipulate our brains.

Flickr

Philip Bacon, president of the South Florida nonprofit Urban Philanthropies, says this weekend’s hiring fair isn’t just about jobs.

“A job is a vehicle toward a career,” he says.

That’s the philosophy of the Global 1000 hiring event that kicked off on Thursday.

 

Best Buy has told music suppliers that it will pull all CDs from its stores this summer, according to a report from Billboard. This move should come as no big surprise: Between unlimited streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify, and the ongoing vinyl revival, CDs just don't have the sway that they used to.

Look up from this screen right now. Take a look around. On a bus. In a cafe. Even at a stoplight. Chances are, most of the other people in your line of sight are staring at their phones or other devices. And if they don't happen to have one out, it is certainly tucked away in a pocket or bag.

But are we truly addicted to technology? And what about our kids? It's a scary question, and a big one for scientists right now. Still, while the debate rages on, some doctors and technologists are focusing on solutions.

Nancy Dahlberg / Miami Herald

Felecia Hatcher knows there are a lot of challenges in the black tech community.

Locations and activity of U.S. military bases; jogging and patrol routes of American soldiers — experts say those details are among the GPS data shared by the exercise tracking company Strava, whose Heat Map reflects more than a billion exercise activities globally. The Pentagon says it's looking at adding new training and policies to address security concerns.

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