technology

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN News

Thanks to a White House-led effort to boost training programs for technology jobs, more than 100 young people in Miami who were unemployed or underemployed now have the credentials to work in Information Technology (IT).

Does Miami Have A Chance To Host Amazon HQ2?

Jan 21, 2018
AP

Miami is still in the race. This week Amazon announced the 20 cities on its short list as it decides where to build its second headquarters (HQ2) – a $5-billion investment promising 50,000 high-paying jobs.

Though the final list singles out Miami, the proposal was a regional effort. 

Amazon Names Miami A Finalist For Second Headquarters

Jan 18, 2018
AP

  Amazon named Miami one of 20 finalists on Thursday to house the tech giant’s second headquarters, HQ2, according to an announcement made by City of Miami Major Francis Suárez. 

 

If you thought your MacBook or iPhone would be immune to the Meltdown and Spectre microprocessor flaws acknowledged earlier this week by Intel, you would be wrong.

The problems found in the chips could allow hackers to get access to passwords and other sensitive data stored on personal computers.

Lindsey Kilbride / WMFE

Using cutting-edge video game technology and animation, the U.S. Army and Homeland Security Department have developed a computer-based simulator that can train everyone from teachers to first responders on how to react to an active shooter scenario.

 

The training center is housed at the University of Central Florida in Orlando and offers numerous role-playing opportunities that can be used to train anyone in the world with a computer.

 

Confirming iPhone owners' suspicions that Apple purposefully slows the operation of older phones, Apple says that it does just that — and that slowing down processors makes it easier for old batteries to perform after they've begun to lose capacity.

Pope Francis has a request for his followers: Put away your phones during Mass.

At a certain point in every service, Francis noted, "the priest says, 'Lift up your hearts.' He doesn't tell us to lift up our cellphones to take pictures."

The power is back on in Florida. So why is the internet still out for some people, more than two weeks after Hurricane Irma struck?

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

A glitch in the booking software reportedly used by some 125 airlines around the world caused brief delays at check-in at airports from Washington, D.C., to Singapore.

Madrid-based Amadeus said its Altea booking software experienced a network problem Thursday morning but that the problem had been fixed.

It was the year 2000 and Maine's governor at the time, Angus King, was excited about the Internet. The World Wide Web was still relatively young but King wanted every student in the state to have access to it.

"Go into history class and the teacher says, 'Open your computer. We're going to go to rome.com and we're going to watch an archaeologist explore the Catacombs this morning in real time.' What a learning tool that is!"

Dynamologic Solutions/flickr

Many of the things we use every day are being labeled “smart” - as in smart phone, smart watch, smart car, smart thermostat.

Mexico’s government appears to have been using advanced spyware created for criminal investigations to target some of the country’s most prominent journalists, lawyers and anti-corruption activists.

The software — called Pegasus — was reportedly created by Israeli cyberarms manufacturer NSO Group and sold to Mexican federal agencies under the condition that it be used to track terrorists and investigate criminals.

Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. And since the founding of this nation, notarizations have been done pretty much the same way: in person.

Now, new technology and new laws are making it possible to skip the sometimes-arduous search for the notary stamp in favor of a video chat — though some concerns about digitization have divided the notary industry.

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